How To Reduce Knee Pain After Meniscus Surgery?

How To Reduce Knee Pain After Meniscus Surgery
Ice and elevation

  1. To reduce swelling and pain, put ice or a cold pack on your knee for 10 to 20 minutes at a time.
  2. For 3 days after surgery, prop up the sore leg on a pillow when you ice it or anytime you sit or lie down.
  3. If your doctor gave you support stockings, wear them as long as he or she tells you to.

How long will my knee hurt after meniscus surgery?

Arthroscopic surgery for a torn meniscus (meniscectomy) – Arthroscopic surgery to remove all or part of the torn meniscus, is a common surgery. Arthroscopic surgery is outpatient same day surgery with local or regional anesthetic. An uncomplicated meniscectomy will resolve most of the pain fairly quickly, but swelling and stiffness take time to resolve.

  1. It may take 4-5 months for full healing.
  2. The patient should be able to bear weight on the knee while standing or walking, immediately after surgery.
  3. Crutches will be necessary for 2-7 days after surgery.
  4. Rehabilitation to gain full ROM should occur within 1-2 weeks.
  5. Heavy work or sports may be restricted for the first 4-6 weeks.

Complicated arthroscopic repair of a meniscus tear requires that the patient’s knee be completely immobilized for 2 weeks after surgery. Followed by 2 weeks of limited motion before resuming daily activities. Physical therapy starts right after surgery.

  • The patient should be able to bear weight on the knee while standing or walking, immediately after surgery with a brace.
  • The patient is expected to walk with crutches for 4-6 weeks after surgery.
  • Rehabilitation is intended to control pan and swelling, achieve maximum range of motion and full load walking.

Patients with a low impact job can return to work 1-2 weeks after surgery, drive after 4-6 weeks, and return to heavy work or sports 3-6 months after surgery.

Why does my knee hurt so much after meniscus surgery?

Transcript: Knee Pain After Meniscus Surgery – I’m Dr. Howard Luks, One of the questions I most frequently receive in the office is “why does my knee hurt after I’ve had meniscus surgery for my meniscus tear?” Well, the answer can be complicated and not often straight forward.

  • There are some easy answers and there are some not so easy answers.
  • First off is that the meniscus tears we see on MRIs are not always a cause of our pain.
  • How is that? Well, if we MRI a significant number of people in their 50s and 60s, yet they have no knee pain, we’re going to find a fair number of meniscus tears in them.

That means that not all meniscus tears hurt. So the meniscus tear may not have been your source of pain to begin with. Second; osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is the loss of cartilage on the ends of your bones. If you have arthritis and you have a meniscus tear, then the arthritis may be severe enough that you’re not going to obtain any relief of pain if the meniscus tear was dealt with.

As a matter of fact (in cases where both osteoarthritis and meniscus tears are present), sometimes your pain can get worse because of something that we call a stress fracture or a stress reaction. That’s where – because a portion of the meniscus has been removed, the bones around the knee joint “see” more stress when you walk and they react by becoming very inflamed and can actually at it’s worse, cause a stress fracture which is quite painful.

That’s commonly seen in people about 10 days to two weeks after surgery when they see an increase in their pain. Unfortunately, it’s impossible to predict who this is going to occur in however, it is far more common in women in their fifth and sixth decades and beyond.

  1. Other reasons for knee pain after meniscus surgery is the fact that there is a retained piece or maybe the tear was fixed and the sutures have not held and the repair failed.
  2. So, there are many reasons why you may still have pain following surgery for a meniscus tear.
  3. Some of it may be simple to explain.

Some of it may not be simple to explain. A new MRI maybe necessary or a new opinion maybe necessary, that ultimately is up to you. I hope you have a great day. Bye.

Why does my knee still hurt 3 months after meniscus surgery?

Swelling, infection, inadequate rehabilitation, spontaneous osteonecrosis, and arthritis in the joint are a few of the factors that cause continued knee pain after surgery.

Should my knee still hurts after meniscus surgery?

Most meniscal surgeries (95%) are partial meniscectomies where part of the meniscus is actually removed, not just repaired. Therefore, the remaining meniscus is now smaller and does not perform as well. The Meniscus is a ring-shaped piece of cartilage whose purpose is to act as a shock absorber for the knee. How To Reduce Knee Pain After Meniscus Surgery Most recent studies have shown meniscal surgery to be no better than physical therapy or Cham surgery. This includes to recent studies from the New England Journal of Medicine, as well as a study from an orthopedic surgical journal. (1,2,3).2 reasons why people have increased risk for pain after meniscal surgery are: 1.

The meniscus can re-tear. Remember the remaining meniscus is smaller but having to work harder since pressure is on the meniscus have not changed.2. The knee now has a significant increase in developing arthritis since part of the meniscus was removed. A study looking at knees 18 months after surgery showed 60% of knees treated with surgery had developed arthritis compared to 33% and patient’s only receiving physical therapy.

(4) What are your treatment options? First, do not have another meniscal surgery. This will only worsen the problem. Second consider Ortho-biologic treatment such as PRP or stem cells which have been shown to be very effective in multiple trials. (5,6). How To Reduce Knee Pain After Meniscus Surgery The bottom line is do not have meniscus surgery. This will only weaken your knee and lead to a significant increase in developing arthritis later in life. Come see us at Regenexx Pittsburgh for state of the art ortho-biologic treatments with PRP and Stem Cells so you can get back to high level function.

  1. 1) Katz JN, Brophy RH, Chaisson CE, et al.
  2. Surgery versus physical therapy for a meniscal tear and osteoarthritis N Engl J Med,2013;368(18):1675–1684.
  3. Doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1301408 (2) Sihvonen R, Paavola M, Malmivaara A, Itälä A, Joukainen A, Nurmi H, Kalske J, Järvinen TL; Finnish Degenerative Meniscal Lesion Study (FIDELITY) Group.

Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy versus sham surgery for a degenerative meniscal tear. N Engl J Med.2013 Dec 26;369(26):2515-24. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1305189, (3) Beaufils P, Pujol N. Management of traumatic meniscal tear and degenerative meniscal lesions.

  • Save the meniscus.
  • Orthop Traumatol Surg Res.2017;103(8S):S237-S244.DOI: 10.1016/j.otsr.2017.08.003 (4) Collins JE, Losina E1,2, Marx RG3, Guermazi A, MeTeOR Investigator Group.
  • Early MRI-based Changes in Patients with Meniscal Tear and Osteoarthritis.
  • Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken).2019 Apr 1.
  • Doi: 10.1002/acr.23891 (5) Filardo G, Kon E, Buda R, Timoncini A, Di Martino A, Cenacchi A, Fornasari PM, Giannini S, Marcacci M.

Platelet-rich plasma intra-articular knee injections for the treatment of degenerative cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc.2011 Apr;19(4):528-35. doi: 10.1007/s00167-010-1238-6, (6) Southworth TM, Naveen NB, Tauro TM, Leong NL, Cole BJ.

How can I heal faster after meniscus surgery?

Post-Surgery Rehabilitation Tips – If you’ve torn your meniscus and are planning on having surgery to repair it, these tips will ensure you have a success recovery and can get back on your feet as soon as possible.1. Remember R.I.C.E Rest, ice, compression, and elevation (R.I.C.E) are recommended for patients recovering from any kind of surgery, include meniscal repair.

  1. Eep these guidelines in mind to make sure you’re getting the most out of this approach: Avoid whatever activity caused your injury and rest as often as possible.
  2. Use an ice pack on your knee for 20 minutes at a time multiple times throughout the day.
  3. Use a knee brace or bandage to provide compression and stabilize the knee.
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Elevate the knee so it’s higher than your heart when resting or icing it to reduce swelling.2. Start Slow Once you start feeling a bit better and are ready to get back on your feet, it can be tempting to jump back into your regular routine. Use crutches for as long as your doctor recommends — sometimes, it can be up to a month — and remember to avoid putting unnecessary pressure on your knee.

Recruit friends and relatives to help you through the recovery process. You also will most likely not be able to drive for a few weeks after your surgery, so have a group of people on hand to drive you home from surgery, to follow-up appointments, and on various errands. It might be frustrating to take it easy post-surgery.

But, remember that it’s better to take some time off now to let your knee heal properly than to risk serious damage from doing too much, too quickly.3. Be Consistent with Your Strengthening Exercises After your surgery, you’ll meet with a physical therapist to start strengthening the muscles around your knee and getting your regular range of motion back.

Make sure that you’re consistent with these exercises and stick to your therapist’s directions. They have helped plenty of people recover from knee surgery and they know what they’re doing.4. Don’t Skip Your Follow-up Appointments When you start getting your range of motion back and feeling more like your old self, it’s easy to assume that you don’t need to see your doctor anymore.

However, it’s important to go to all of your follow-up appointments to make sure everything is healing properly. Your surgeon might notice issues that you aren’t aware of, so don’t assume that you’re good to go just because everything “feels normal” to you.5.

  1. Protect Yourself From Future Injuries Your surgeon will most likely recommend that you wear a knee brace after your surgery.
  2. For people who have had meniscal repair, a hinged knee brace is common.
  3. This type of brace helps control your flexion and tension in your knee and ensure a proper range of motion.

It’s important to wear this brace for as long as your doctor recommends to promote healing and prevent future injuries. Even after you get the go-ahead to stop wearing a hinged knee brace, a sleeve or wraparound brace is still helpful to wear until you feel totally recovered.

Some people continue to wear them even after they’ve recovered as a precautionary measure. Key Takeaways Not every meniscal tear requires surgical repair, but surgeries are quite common, and recovery depends on a number of factors, including age, weight, and medical history. You can’t always control how soon you will be back on your feet after your surgery, but, to help speed up your recovery and ensure proper healing, keep these tips in mind! Nurse Susan has always been passionate about helping people heal.

After she retired from a lifelong career as a nurse, that passion didn’t go away. She loves to use her expertise to write about the best ways to keep you and your family healthy, active, and happy. : 5 Post-Surgery Rehabilitation Tips for Recovering from a Torn Meniscus

Is walking good after meniscus surgery?

How long after meniscus surgery will I be able to walk, exercise and work? – Most people can walk with crutches soon after meniscus surgery. Many return to normal activities within six to eight weeks. Your healthcare provider may recommend low-impact activities rather than high-impact (such as walking rather than running).

Fever higher than 101 degrees Fahrenheit. Lots of drainage (blood or fluid) on the dressing. Pain or swelling that is not relieved by resting or elevating the leg. Pus or foul-smelling drainage from any incisions. Trouble breathing.

A note from Cleveland Clinic Meniscus surgery can fix an injured or torn meniscus, a piece of cartilage in the knee joint. Talk to your healthcare professional if you have knee pain that interferes with your life, work or activities. An arthroscopic procedure can reduce pain, improve mobility and stability, and help you return to activities.

Should I massage my knee after meniscus surgery?

By Articles, Massage Comments Off on Massage after knee surgery? How It Can Help Your Healing “The effects of massage therapy on pain, swelling and range of motion after total knee replacement surgery was examined in 2015 research published in the Journal of Physical Therapy Science.

( https://www.amtamassage.org/publications/massage-therapy-journal/massage-orthopedic-pathologies/ ) The study found that massage is a comparable alternative to physical therapy to manage knee edema early in postoperative recovery,” Itmight seem counterintuitive to think about massage after knee replacementsurgery when the pain of recovery can sometimes be greater than the pain that originally sent you for the procedure! The process of knee replacement involves cutting into muscles around the knee joint which causes the body to respond to such severe trauma with inflammation and ultimately withthe growth of scar tissue.

However, the research and physiological wisdom suggests that healing can occur more efficiently if massage is an integral part of the recovery strategy. Here’s why: Deep tissue massage when administered a few weeks post-surgery can help relieve the swelling and promote relaxation.

  • Itcan help calm muscle spasm responses and can support the flow of blood supply to the area to promote healing, reduce swelling andturn the volume down on pain.
  • It can also pre-emptively breakdown scar tissue that causes stiffness and restricted motiontoallow you to return more quickly to your pre-surgery bend capability.What does that means in real life? the ability to navigate stairs, play with your kids, walk and run and ride a bicycle sooner.

The genius of massage is in its ability to move fluids that the body has sent to the injured area back into the blood vessels where they should be which results in reduction of swelling and inflammation. Massage in post-op knee replacement begins with emphasis on the thigh and hamstring muscles to help reduce muscle tension that causes spasming and cramping in the area.

  1. Additionally, a general full-body massage can help relieve tension, stress and anxiety and can stimulate circulation to all tendons and muscles including those in the knee area.
  2. Long-term recovery for knee replacement involves the ability for the new knee to work with the existing structure.
  3. Part of that workability is alignment which is a specialty that massage can deliver.

While physical therapy can increase muscle strength, it is massage techniques that have the ability to train all parts of your knee to work together – the end result is less pain, smoother action and improved range of motion so that you can resume normal life activities sooner than later.

What you should not do after meniscus surgery?

Meniscal Recovery Plan – Diet : You may resume a regular diet when you return home. Start with tea or broth and advance slowly with crackers or toast, then a sandwich. If you become nauseated, return to clear liquids. Pain Control: Take pain medication as prescribed by Dr.

  1. Reznik. Please call our office with any questions regarding your medication.
  2. Ice as needed (never place ice directly on skin) and elevate leg above heart level using 2-3 pillows.
  3. This will also decrease swelling.
  4. Stop smoking : Smoking slows the healing process by interfering with the making of new DNA.

Smoking also increases the risk of infection and pneumonia after surgery by slowing your body’s white blood cells. Deep Breathing : Be sure to regularly take a deep breath and blow it out. This helps to clear the lungs after anesthesia. Knee Immobilizer : Meniscal Repair patients are to wear the knee immobilizer full time for the first 3 weeks to protect the repair for the first phase of healing.

  1. This includes while you are sleeping.
  2. It is to be removed only for physical therapy directed exercises and showers.
  3. Note : Patients should not flex the knee past 90 degrees for the first 3 weeks even if you therapist says it is okay.
  4. After 3 weeks, you will change from the immobilizer to a knee hinged brace.

This is normally done by the physical therapist; if you or your therapist is unsure about what to use or when to change your brace call Dr. Reznik’s office. Under guidance, you can then start bending the knee from 90 degrees to a maximum of 120 degrees.

When first switching to the knee hinge brace, you may need to use two crutches again for a short time to help with balance if needed. Crutches : Patients are to use two crutches for the first week, putting light weight on the operative leg with each step with the immobilizer on. Remember to put the involved foot flat on the ground.

Knee Pain after Meniscus Surgery

Most patients can be fully weight bearing by the end of the first week while continuing to wear the immobilizer. After the first week, you may then increase weight as tolerated and advance to one crutch for a few days and then a cane if needed. Meniscus (cartilage) Repair patients cannot do twisting, pivoting, squatting, deep knee bends or impact activities for four months.

  1. It is vital that meniscus repair patients do not squat for at least four months after the repair.
  2. Return to Work : People with light work (like desk or computer work with no squatting, lifting or kneeling) can return to work within a week to ten day with the brace on.
  3. The exception is for people who may have long commutes.
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By staying still with the leg down for long periods, increases the risk of a BLOOD CLOT in the leg. Patients with active office work or very light labor with variable tasks can sometimes go back to work at two or three weeks, depending on lifting requirements and if their employer will make accommodations for light duty.

Heavy work, (lifting or unprotected heights) cannot usually return before 6 weeks. Most will need to be cleared by their physical therapist. The heaviest of labor, working in unprotected heights would naturally take longer. Driving: Right knee patients and left knee patients with a standard transmission car cannot drive until out of the knee immobilizer, off all pain meds and can fully weight bear without pain.

Left knee surgery patients can drive after 3 weeks if they have no pain and you are off pain all pain medications comfortable walking without crutches. Blood Clots : Those at higher risk of blood clots include those patients who have sedentary life styles, long car or train commutes, have a history of prior cancer, women on birth control pills, may be overweight or males over the age of 40.

These patients should be taking an at least a baby aspirin per day (unless allergic or sensitive). Doing the exercises (ankle pumps below), using aspirin and at times compressive stockings will also reduce the risk of blood clots. Patients who have a history of clots in the past or three or more of the above risk factors should ask if they should be on a blood thinner post op for at least six weeks.

Call the Physician If:

You develop excessive, prolonged nausea or vomiting Fever above 101 You develop any type of rash You experience calf pain

Post-Operative Exercises : Start doing exercises while still in the recovery room. Dr. Reznik or your nurse will instruct you on what to do. At home, while resting in bed after surgery do the following every hour or with each set of TV commercials. Ankle Pumps : Pump your ankle up and down for 1 minute (like pressing on the gas pedal).

  1. This will increase circulation and reduce the risk of developing a blood clot.
  2. If watching TV, do this during every commercial.
  3. Straight Leg Raise : Tighten your quads (muscle in the front of your thigh) with the knee immobilizer on and raise your leg 8 to 12 inches off the bed.
  4. Do at least three times a day.

Add other exercises as your therapist gives them to you. Knee bends/heel slides : With your heel on the bed, bend your knee while sliding your heel toward you. Start with bending 30-45 degrees and work toward 90 degrees during the first week. If you are in bed for extended periods, move your arms regularly.

Can you overdo it after meniscus surgery?

Arthroscopic Surgery Postoperative Instructions You have just had an arthroscopic surgery. It is most important to remember that although the external incisions are small, the interior structures take four to eight weeks to heal and quiet down. Overuse of your knee during this period can slow down your recovery.

Swelling: You can expect some swelling in the knees. The amount is variable, depending on individual circumstances. The swelling should diminish within several weeks. Ice and Elevation: This is the most important for the first few days. This will keep the postoperative swelling to a minimum. The Polar Pad is to be used 12 hours per day for the first 48 hours, then 1 to 2 hours twice per day, thereafter.

Keep foot and ankle moving while resting. Exercise and Rehabilitation: Doing straight leg raises is all that is necessary initially. This is done by tightening the thigh muscle and then lifting the leg up six to tweleve inches off the surface for a count of one to two seconds.

  • The leg is then gently lowered.
  • The goal is to try to repeat this exercise 25 times per hour.
  • Range of motion of the knee can be carried out within the limits of pain tolerance.
  • During the first week it is necessart to avoid weight machines.
  • Crutches: You may need crutches for one to three days after surgery.

The goal is to not be overly active. If the knee is not tremendously painful, walking can occur without crutches; however, do not overdo it in the first two to three days after surgery since this could result in more swelling than is necessary. Pain Medication: You will receive a prescription for pain medication.

It should be taken as needed. Most people require pain medications for a few days. A local anesthetic has been placed in your knee post-op; you may not have pain for 24 hours; do not overdo activity initially because the lack of pain is form the local anesthesia still “numbing” your knee. Also, take one 325 mg aspirin each day until I see you back for your follow up visit.

Dressing: Please leave the surgical dressing on the leg until post op day number three. You may have some bleeding or leakage from the puncture sites for a few days, which is normal. Bright red bleeding should be reported to our office immediately. You may also shower on post op day number three.

  1. Office Checkup: We will need to see you in the office.
  2. Call 298-4417 to schedule an appointment.
  3. Should you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact us.
  4. If you are having problems and we do not know about them, we cannot assist you.
  5. Most people have soreness and aching initially, which will gradually diminish.

Watch For and Contact Us If:

Temperature is above 101Pain is severeMarked redness or continuing drainageMarked or significant swelling in your calf

Office Phone- Always answered: (937)298-4417, or MatchMD 1-888-392-8212 Article by : Arthroscopic Surgery Postoperative Instructions

Why does meniscus repair take so long to heal?

The amount of blood flow which is or is not present within different parts of a meniscus is the reason it takes so long for menisci to heal when injured. It is best to think of a meniscus as three circumferential zones.

When can I bear weight after meniscus repair?

Patient will be non-weight bearing for 6 weeks immediately following surgery unless otherwise directed. Progress to partial weight bearing with brace at week 6. Progress to full weight bearing with brace unlocked (if adequate quad control) near week 8.

How do I know if my meniscus surgery failed?

Signs and symptoms when meniscus repair fails – If a patient develops pain along the joint line or locking or catching during his postoperative course, it is possible that the meniscus repair didn’t heal. An MRI in the early weeks after surgery can be confusing because the repair might not be expected to have fully healed yet.

Also a regular MRI might fail to demonstrate the difference between scar tissue within the repair and a new or continued tear. An MR arthrogram, where dye is injected in the knee before the MRI, is more helpful. Dye can leak through the repair and show that it hasn’t healed. Also read: Ask Dr. Geier – Arthritis after a meniscus tear Ask Dr.

Geier – Meniscus tears in young athletes If a meniscus repair fails, the surgeon usually performs a second surgery to trim out the tear. As with any partial meniscectomy, that trimming relieves pain but does decrease the amount of meniscus remaining. Concern for the development of arthritis changes years down the road does exist.

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Where does it hurt after meniscus surgery?

Too much meniscus removed – Surgery comes with risks. General risks include infection, nerve damage, reaction to anesthesia. Sometimes there is a risk that the surgery can cause further damage and pain. How? Too much meniscus is removed. People have knee pain after meniscus surgery because some of them had too much meniscus removed.

  • The meniscus is a pad.
  • It acts as a shock absorber to prevent the bottom of the thigh bone from crashing into the top of the shin bone.
  • People are “bone on bone” because the meniscus is “gone” and the articular cartilage that covers the bones has also worn away.
  • This problem is described in a September 2021 paper presented in the Sports medicine and arthroscopy review,( 1 ) “The meniscus has an important role in stabilizing the knee joint and protecting the articular cartilage from shear forces.

Meniscus tears are common injuries and can disrupt these protective properties, leading to an increased risk of articular cartilage damage and eventual osteoarthritis. Certain tear patterns are often treated with arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, which can effectively relieve symptoms.

However, removal of meniscal tissue can also diminish the ability of the meniscus to dissipate hoop stresses (weight bearing pressure on the outside of the meniscus), resulting in altered biomechanics of the knee joint including increased contact pressures.” “Altered biomechanics of the knee joint including increased contact pressures” describes a situation of accelerated knee osteoarthritis.

This can be where the more pain after surgery is coming from. What may occur is that the surgery removed a portion of the meniscus to alleviate the patients pain. In doing so, the surgery made the meniscus smaller in size and compromised and weakened the meniscus’ ability to provide the needed cushion Nature designed it for.

How much pain is normal after meniscus tear?

Progression – Over 4-6 weeks, the pain and swelling may decrease and activities of daily living may become tolerable. However, athletic activities may reproduce pain and swelling. Sometimes even activities of daily living such as going up and down stairs or getting in and out of cars may produce pain in a knee with a torn meniscus.

How do I know if my meniscus is healing after surgery?

These are the typical times for returning to activities. –

Progress Uncomplicated Meniscus Removal or Meniscectomy Meniscus Repair Surgery
Bear some weight put weight on your knee Right after the intervention, if you can tolerate it. After the surgery, with the help of a brace.
Walk with no crutches 2-7 Days 4-6 weeks
Drive 1-2 weeks, if:

You can move with minimal or no pain. You are not on opioid medication.

4-6 weeks
Full movement capacity 1-2 weeks Bending is usually restricted to under 90 degrees for the first 4-6 weeks while the meniscus is still healing.
Come back to athletic activity 4-6 weeks, if:

If your motion and strength are recovered. There is no swelling or pain in your knee.

3-6 months

Can I climb stairs after meniscus surgery?

Answer: – Immediately after surgery you will learn to climb stairs safely using crutches. As recovery continues and you work on flexion and extension of the new knee, you will be able to climb without crutches. With the help of physical therapy and building up the quadriceps muscles, stair climbing will be a breeze.

How long should your knee hurt after arthroscopic surgery?

Pain is quite common, most often in the area where you had pain before surgery, in the soft tissues below the knee cap, over the athroscopy wounds and occasionally the whole knee. The pain settles usually within two to three weeks, but may take upwards of six weeks.

Will my knee be back to normal after meniscus surgery?

You should soon start seeing improvement in your knee. You may be able to return to most of your regular activities within a few weeks. But it will be several months before you have complete use of your knee. It may take as long as 6 months before your knee is strong enough for hard physical work or certain sports.

How do I know if my meniscus surgery was successful?

If the knee does well and there are no significant symptoms, then it follows that the tear must have healed up and the repair was successful. If, however, a patient is unlucky enough to develop recurrent symptoms and ongoing problems with the knee, then the assumption is that the attempted repair has failed.

Can you overdo it after meniscus surgery?

Arthroscopic Surgery Postoperative Instructions You have just had an arthroscopic surgery. It is most important to remember that although the external incisions are small, the interior structures take four to eight weeks to heal and quiet down. Overuse of your knee during this period can slow down your recovery.

Swelling: You can expect some swelling in the knees. The amount is variable, depending on individual circumstances. The swelling should diminish within several weeks. Ice and Elevation: This is the most important for the first few days. This will keep the postoperative swelling to a minimum. The Polar Pad is to be used 12 hours per day for the first 48 hours, then 1 to 2 hours twice per day, thereafter.

Keep foot and ankle moving while resting. Exercise and Rehabilitation: Doing straight leg raises is all that is necessary initially. This is done by tightening the thigh muscle and then lifting the leg up six to tweleve inches off the surface for a count of one to two seconds.

  • The leg is then gently lowered.
  • The goal is to try to repeat this exercise 25 times per hour.
  • Range of motion of the knee can be carried out within the limits of pain tolerance.
  • During the first week it is necessart to avoid weight machines.
  • Crutches: You may need crutches for one to three days after surgery.

The goal is to not be overly active. If the knee is not tremendously painful, walking can occur without crutches; however, do not overdo it in the first two to three days after surgery since this could result in more swelling than is necessary. Pain Medication: You will receive a prescription for pain medication.

It should be taken as needed. Most people require pain medications for a few days. A local anesthetic has been placed in your knee post-op; you may not have pain for 24 hours; do not overdo activity initially because the lack of pain is form the local anesthesia still “numbing” your knee. Also, take one 325 mg aspirin each day until I see you back for your follow up visit.

Dressing: Please leave the surgical dressing on the leg until post op day number three. You may have some bleeding or leakage from the puncture sites for a few days, which is normal. Bright red bleeding should be reported to our office immediately. You may also shower on post op day number three.

  1. Office Checkup: We will need to see you in the office.
  2. Call 298-4417 to schedule an appointment.
  3. Should you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact us.
  4. If you are having problems and we do not know about them, we cannot assist you.
  5. Most people have soreness and aching initially, which will gradually diminish.

Watch For and Contact Us If:

Temperature is above 101Pain is severeMarked redness or continuing drainageMarked or significant swelling in your calf

Office Phone- Always answered: (937)298-4417, or MatchMD 1-888-392-8212 Article by : Arthroscopic Surgery Postoperative Instructions