Abdominal Pain Which Doctor To See?

Abdominal Pain Which Doctor To See
Overview Minor stomach discomfort can come and go, but persistent stomach pain can be a sign of a serious health problem. If you have chronic digestive issues such as bloating, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, your primary care physician will probably refer you to a specialist.

  • A gastroenterologist is a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating disorders of the digestive system.
  • Doctor’s appointments can be hectic and a bit stressful, especially when you’re seeking a diagnosis.
  • You depend on your doctor to figure out what’s wrong and what the best course of treatment is.

Your doctor relies on you to provide as much information as you can, and to ask questions. Working in partnership with your doctor will help move you toward a diagnosis. Then you can begin treatment, learn how to manage your symptoms, and improve your quality of life.

What kind of Dr do you see for abdominal pain?

7 Signs It’s Time to See a Gastroenterologist WHEN SHOULD I WORRY ABOUT. If you have unexplained or frequent digestive issues, such as abdominal discomfort or changes to your bowel habits, someone’s probably told you to see a gastroenterologist, also sometimes referred to as a GI doctor.

When should you see doctor for abdominal pain?

When to See a Doctor for Abdominal Pain – If your abdominal pain is concerning to you, you should visit your doctor. Below are commonly reported symptoms for which people seek medical care. If you have concerns about what you’re experiencing, you should seek medical advice. Here are commonly reported abdominal pain symptoms:

You’re vomiting blood You have tarry or bloody stools Your pain extends beyond your abdomen to your chest, shoulder or jaw You have shortness of breath You’re pregnant, have cancer or have had a recent trauma Your abdomen is significantly distended or is very tender You’re unable to keep fluids down for 24 hours You have a fever Your pain is severe Your skin is yellow You’re unable to have a bowel movement

If you experience any of the following, you should see your doctor:

Mild pain that self-limits but recurs frequently Pain that wakes you up at night Pain and bloating that last more than 2 days Burning or pain with urination Dull pain that lasts for more than a week Pain that causes poor appetite or weight loss

How do doctors diagnose abdominal pain?

Tests for abdominal pain – Your doctor may order urine, blood and stool tests. Imaging tests are also helpful for detecting abnormalities inside your gastrointestinal system and other organs. These tests may include X-rays, CT scan, ultrasound, barium enema or endoscopy,

Should I see a gynecologist for abdominal pain?

Why You Should Visit Your OBGYN If Experiencing Abdominal Pain Abdominal Pain Which Doctor To See At one time or another, we all experience some pain or distress in our abdomen. It could be anything from something we ate to poor sleep habits that upset our stomachs. But, abdominal pain isn’t always actually being generated in the digestive tract. For many women, gynecological issues present as abdominal pain that can be radiating from the pelvis and even traveling into the back.

  1. That’s why it’s so important to visit your OBGYN if you’re suddenly experiencing abdominal pain that doesn’t seem to be self-resolving and isn’t clearly related to digestion.
  2. To be sure, if the pain is intense enough, medical care will be sought out.
  3. But, many women try to just ride it out and see if it goes away.

Persistent abdominal pain is and it’s highly recommended you get it checked by an OBGYN. The first fear every person has is of course cancer. While there is always the chance of cancer, it is most likely something else that is suddenly causing you this pain statistically speaking.

  • Here are a few of the conditions that can cause debilitating abdominal pain and how your OBGYN can provide treatment.
  • Fibroids are incredibly common.
  • In fact, they are the most common gynecologic tumors that afflict women of reproductive age.
  • It’s believed anywhere from 20 to 50% of women have fibroids of some kind.

While the word “tumor” conjures up cancer, know that fibroids are benign. They do not turn into cancer and they do not increase your risk of developing cancer. However, they can be quite painful. They grow in the smooth muscle of the uterus and can come in a variety of sizes, though most women have fibroids so small as to be virtually undetectable.

  • It’s important to note, however, that they can affect the ability to get pregnant which is why they need to be treated if you are looking to have children.
  • Endometriosis can also cause both pain and difficulty getting pregnant.
  • This is not a condition related to tumors, however.
  • Every month during menstruation, uterine tissue gets expelled.
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When that tissue begins to grow outside the uterus, it can be present in the abdomen, fallopian tubes, ovaries, ureters, intestine, or anus. The pain begins because this tissue still goes through its monthly cycle due to the presence of estrogen. However, instead of being expelled, it remains trapped which causes inflammation and scarring.

  • Cystitis Cystitis is inflammation in the bladder that can cause pain and increased frequency in urination.
  • In most cases, it’s the result of a bacterial infection.
  • UTIs are very common and respond well to a course of antibiotics.
  • That doesn’t mean they should be taken lightly, though.
  • While most people seek treatment for their cystitis before major complications arise, the infection can spread to the kidneys and become life threatening if antibiotics aren’t administered in a timely manner.

Interstitial cystitis is chronic inflammation that isn’t related to bacteria. This can be more difficult to treat and your OBGYN will approach it with a variety of treatments after identifying the root cause. How your OBGYN can help Every condition requires a different course of treatment.

Medication designed to provide relief from pain is often prescribed for these conditions. How that medication is delivered depends on your individual circumstance. Certain kinds of physical therapy may also be employed. is used for a variety of chronic conditions that cause discomfort or pain. Pelvic pain disorders like endometriosis may respond well to this physical therapy.

It can also be used to relieve skeletal pain during pregnancy. It may even be used for incontinence. If a condition like fibroids is debilitating enough and doesn’t respond to other courses of treatment, a may be recommended. Don’t be alarmed that a hysterectomy is inevitable.

  • Other treatments usually prove successful before needing to take this step, however this solution is there should your condition ultimately call for it.
  • Your OBGYN has many tools at their disposal to help you manage, if not outright get rid of, the condition that is causing you abdominal pain and discomfort.

But, it’s important to get the proper diagnosis so you can begin the road to recovery. Conclusion If there is one thing you should never ignore, it’s persistent pain in the abdominal region. Pain can radiate, so if you’re experiencing chronic pain in the abdomen, pelvis, or back, it’s highly recommended that you see your OBGYN for an evaluation.

  • While there is a chance it could be nothing serious, it is much better to be safe than sorry.
  • Early intervention is key for nearly every condition that affects your health.
  • With us today.
  • The team at The Association for Women’s Health Care is dedicated to providing you with the treatments and services you need so you can lead a healthy life free of pain.

Sleep problems, frequent urination, unprecedented mood swings: These are all common symptoms of menopause that can have widespread consequences in your personal and professional life. With help from your OB/GYN, you can feel more like yourself again. Pap smears are a crucial component in cervical cancer prevention and diagnosis.

  1. If you get an abnormal result, don’t panic: It just means you need more testing.
  2. Infertility may affect your chances of getting pregnant without intervention, but it doesn’t mean you should give up.
  3. Read about five of the top conditions that could affect your fertility and what we can do to help you.
  4. During the anticipation of pregnancy and labor, you might lose sight of the possible challenges that come next.

Postpartum depression is more common than many prospective new parents expect. If you have any plans of having kids, it’s never a bad time to take inventory of your lifestyle and the behaviors that might affect your fertility. Read on to learn how your lifestyle could help or hinder your ability to have children.

Where should I go for abdominal pain?

How do I know when to go to the ER for stomach pain? – Because common conditions, like food poisoning or constipation, can cause abdominal pain, it can often be difficult to know when your symptoms require a trip to the ER. If you are having unexplained or severe abdominal pain, or if you are in doubt about the cause of your abdominal pain, it is always best to be examined by a professional.

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New onset of pain Chronic abdominal pain Worsening pain Radiating pain Nausea or vomiting Diarrhea Dehydration Bloating or swelling Loss of consciousness Fatigue Weakness Shortness of breath Blood in stool

When you arrive at either of iCare ER & Urgent Care’s state-of-the-art facilities in Fort Worth or Frisco, you will be promptly seen by one of our knowledgeable board-certified ER physicians. Your physician will perform a thorough examination, take a detailed health history, and run any necessary tests – such as lab work or imaging studies – to help elucidate the cause of your stomach pain.

What is the most common type of abdominal pain?

The most common causes — such as gas pains, indigestion or a pulled muscle — usually aren’t serious. Other conditions may require urgent medical attention. While the location and pattern of abdominal pain can provide important clues, its time course is particularly useful when determining its cause.

Can an ultrasound detect abdominal pain?

Why it’s done – An abdominal ultrasound is done to see the blood vessels and organs in the belly area. Your health care provider may recommend this test if you have a condition affecting any of these body areas:

Blood vessels in the abdomen Gallbladder Intestines Kidneys Liver Pancreas Spleen

For example, an abdominal ultrasound can help determine the cause of stomach pain or bloating. It can help check for kidney stones, liver disease, tumors and many other conditions. Your provider may recommend this test if you’re at risk of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

Why is my lower abdomen paining?

– Certain foods and drinks can contribute to abdominal bloating and lower abdominal pain. Avoiding one or more of these may help prevent these symptoms.

beansbeerBrussels sproutscabbagecarbonated beverageschewing gum dairy products if you’re lactose intolerant hard candyhigh-fat foods lentils turnips

Smoking can also increase symptoms. If you quit, you’ll not only reduce these symptoms but also help your overall health. Increasing your fiber intake by eating more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains may help prevent constipation.

Should I see a gynecologist or OB GYN?

While Many Choose to Pursue Both Specialties, There Are Distinct Differences – What’s the difference between obstetricians and gynecologists? While OB/GYN is considered one specialty, it comprises two distinct fields.

Obstetrics (the OB) involves care during pre-conception, pregnancy, childbirth, and immediately after delivery. Gynecology (the GYN) involves care of all women’s health issues.

Here’s what students specializing in either, or both, of these fields can expect.

What kind of infection causes abdominal pain?

– Many conditions can cause abdominal pain. But the main causes are:

infectionabnormal growthsinflammationobstruction (blockage)intestinal disordersinflammationdiseases that affect the organs in the abdomen

Infections in the throat, intestines, and blood can cause bacteria to enter your digestive tract, resulting in abdominal pain. These infections may also cause changes in digestion, like diarrhea or constipation. Cramps associated with menstruation are also a potential source of lower abdominal pain, but these are more commonly known to cause pelvic pain.

constipation diarrhea gastroenteritis (stomach flu) acid reflux (when stomach contents leak backward into the esophagus, causing heartburn and other symptoms) vomiting stress

Diseases that affect the digestive system can also cause chronic abdominal pain. The most common are:

gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) irritable bowel syndrome or spastic colon (a disorder that causes abdominal pain, cramping, and changes in bowel movements) Crohn’s disease (an inflammatory bowel disease) lactose intolerance (the inability to digest lactose, the sugar found in milk and milk products)

Causes of severe abdominal pain include:

organ rupture or near-rupture (like a burst appendix, or appendicitis) gallbladder stones (known as gallstones) kidney stones kidney infection

The location of the pain within the abdomen may be a clue as to its cause. Pain that’s generalized throughout the abdomen (not in one specific area) may indicate:

appendicitis (inflammation of the appendix)Crohn’s diseasetraumatic injury irritable bowel syndrome urinary tract infection the flu

Pain that’s focused in the lower abdomen may indicate:

appendicitis intestinal obstruction ectopic pregnancy (a pregnancy that occurs outside the womb)

In people assigned female at birth, pain in the reproductive organs of the lower abdomen can be caused by:

severe menstrual pain (called dysmenorrhea ) ovarian cysts miscarriage fibroids endometriosis pelvic inflammatory disease ectopic pregnancy

Upper abdominal pain may be caused by:

gallstones heart attack hepatitis (liver inflammation) pneumonia

Pain in the center of the abdomen might be from:

appendicitisgastroenteritisinjury uremia (buildup of waste products in your blood)

Lower left abdominal pain may be caused by:

Crohn’s disease cancer kidney infectionovarian cystsappendicitis

Upper left abdominal pain is sometimes caused by:

enlarged spleen fecal impaction (hardened stool that can’t be eliminated)injurykidney infectionheart attackcancer

Causes of lower right abdominal pain include:

appendicitis hernia (when an organ protrudes through a weak spot in the abdominal muscles)kidney infectioncancerflu

Upper right abdominal pain may result from:

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hepatitisinjurypneumoniaappendicitis

What organs are affected by abdominal pain?

Abdominal pain is common and often minor. Severe abdominal pain that comes on quickly, however, almost always indicates a significant problem. The pain may be the only sign of the need for surgery and must be attended to swiftly. Older adults and those who have HIV infection or who are taking immunosuppressants (including corticosteroids) may have less abdominal pain than younger/healthy adults with a similar disorder, and, even if the condition is serious, the pain may develop more gradually.

Young children, especially newborns and infants, may develop abdominal pain but are unable to communicate the reason for their distress. There are different types of abdominal pain depending on the structures involved. Visceral pain comes from the organs within the abdominal cavity (which are called the viscera).

The viscera’s nerves do not respond to cutting, tearing, or inflammation. Instead, the nerves respond to the organ being stretched (as when the intestine is expanded by gas) or surrounding muscles contract. Visceral pain is typically vague, dull, and nauseating.

It may be hard to pinpoint. Upper abdominal pain results from disorders in organs such as the stomach, duodenum, liver, and pancreas. Midabdominal pain (near the navel) results from disorders of structures such as the small intestine, upper part of the colon, and appendix. Lower abdominal pain results from disorders of the lower part of the colon and organs in the genitourinary tract.

Somatic pain comes from the membrane (peritoneum) that lines the abdominal cavity (peritoneal cavity). Unlike nerves in the visceral organs, nerves in the peritoneum respond to cutting and irritation (such as from blood, infection, chemicals, or inflammation). ). For example, a person who has gallbladder disease may feel pain in the shoulder blade. The source of the pain is the gallbladder, which is located in the abdomen, but the pain is felt in the shoulder.

What is normal abdominal pain?

Abdominal pain (sometimes called stomachache or bellyache) is usually felt in the part of the trunk below the ribs, above the pelvis and the groin. It can range in intensity from a mild ache to severe, disabling pain. While abdominal pain isn’t normal, it isn’t necessarily serious, and it often resolves itself.

What is the most likely diagnosis for abdominal pain?

Some of the most common causes of abdominal pain are appendicitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), pancreatitis, gallbladder disease, diverticulitis, and small bowel obstruction.

Why do I have constant abdominal pain?

– Many conditions can cause abdominal pain. But the main causes are:

infectionabnormal growthsinflammationobstruction (blockage)intestinal disordersinflammationdiseases that affect the organs in the abdomen

Infections in the throat, intestines, and blood can cause bacteria to enter your digestive tract, resulting in abdominal pain. These infections may also cause changes in digestion, like diarrhea or constipation. Cramps associated with menstruation are also a potential source of lower abdominal pain, but these are more commonly known to cause pelvic pain.

constipation diarrhea gastroenteritis (stomach flu) acid reflux (when stomach contents leak backward into the esophagus, causing heartburn and other symptoms) vomiting stress

Diseases that affect the digestive system can also cause chronic abdominal pain. The most common are:

gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) irritable bowel syndrome or spastic colon (a disorder that causes abdominal pain, cramping, and changes in bowel movements) Crohn’s disease (an inflammatory bowel disease) lactose intolerance (the inability to digest lactose, the sugar found in milk and milk products)

Causes of severe abdominal pain include:

organ rupture or near-rupture (like a burst appendix, or appendicitis) gallbladder stones (known as gallstones) kidney stones kidney infection

The location of the pain within the abdomen may be a clue as to its cause. Pain that’s generalized throughout the abdomen (not in one specific area) may indicate:

appendicitis (inflammation of the appendix)Crohn’s diseasetraumatic injury irritable bowel syndrome urinary tract infection the flu

Pain that’s focused in the lower abdomen may indicate:

appendicitis intestinal obstruction ectopic pregnancy (a pregnancy that occurs outside the womb)

In people assigned female at birth, pain in the reproductive organs of the lower abdomen can be caused by:

severe menstrual pain (called dysmenorrhea ) ovarian cysts miscarriage fibroids endometriosis pelvic inflammatory disease ectopic pregnancy

Upper abdominal pain may be caused by:

gallstones heart attack hepatitis (liver inflammation) pneumonia

Pain in the center of the abdomen might be from:

appendicitisgastroenteritisinjury uremia (buildup of waste products in your blood)

Lower left abdominal pain may be caused by:

Crohn’s disease cancer kidney infectionovarian cystsappendicitis

Upper left abdominal pain is sometimes caused by:

enlarged spleen fecal impaction (hardened stool that can’t be eliminated)injurykidney infectionheart attackcancer

Causes of lower right abdominal pain include:

appendicitis hernia (when an organ protrudes through a weak spot in the abdominal muscles)kidney infectioncancerflu

Upper right abdominal pain may result from:

hepatitisinjurypneumoniaappendicitis