Heart Rate Monitor Hospital How To Read?

Heart Rate Monitor Hospital How To Read
What the Numbers Mean: – Various patient monitors can record and track a wide array of information, but almost all patient monitors will record these key vital signs: Heart Rate (HR): Typically, the heart rate is presented at the top of the monitor in green. The number will be identified by a “HR” or “PR” (pulse rate) beside or just above it and is presented in beats per minute (bpm). A normal adult has a resting heart rate between 60-100 bpm.

Blood Pressure (BP): The patient’s blood pressure is typically presented on the screen under “SYST” or “SYS” for systolic and “DIAS” or “DIA” for diastolic. An average BP is around 120/80. Oxygen Saturation (SpO2): The patient’s oxygen saturation will be located on the monitor under “SpO2” and is a measure of the amount of oxygen in the patient’s blood.

A normal O2 saturation is 95% or greater; however, it is important to remember that some populations such as those with COPD have a lower normal cutoff. Respiratory Rate (RR): Look for the patient’s respiratory rate under “RR” on the patient monitor. It is reported in breaths per minute, with normal values between 12 and 20.

What do the numbers mean on a hospital heart monitor?

How to Read a Patient Monitor: Numbers and Lines Explained can be slightly intimidating when you’re unsure what exactly you’re looking at. With all of the multi-colored numbers and wavy lines, things can get a bit confusing. So, our “how to read a patient monitor” article will help, covering most of the basic standard parameters of a patient monitor. Heart Rate: Also known as HR, is typically on display using green numbers. The heart rate is in the right corner of the screen. The number identifies with HR, RR, or ECG next to or above it. In addition, the number is shown in beats per minute, or BPM. Respiration Rate: Or RESP, is reports in breaths per minute.

It is the number showing on the screen below “RESP”. Temperature: Otherwise known as TEMP, is reports in degrees Fahrenheit or degrees Celsius. It is the number seen on the screen under “TEMP”. Oxygen Saturation: Also known as SpO2, is the measure of the amount of oxygen in the patients blood. Additionally, Oxygen Saturation is shown on the monitor under “SpO2”.

Carbon Dioxide: Or, reports in mmHg. It is the number on the monitor displaying under “CO2”. Invasive Blood Pressure: Also known as IBP, reports in mmHg. Further, it’s important to note that some patient monitors can display multiple channels. In this case, Arterial Blood Pressure (ART) and Central Venous Blood Pressure (CVP) is showing. ECG Strip: The intent of the ECG Strip is NOT for an in-depth ECG analysis. Typically, the ECG strip only represents one lead (commonly lead II). Respiratory Waveform: The Respiratory Waveform can be helpful for clinicians monitoring any respiratory issues like apnea or dyspnea.

  • SpO2 Waveform: The SpO2 Waveform can help in determining if there are any issues with circulation or peripheral perfusion.
  • In addition, every peak on the SpO2 Waveform should correlate with the heartbeat on the ECG Waveform at close intervals.
  • Further, because oxygenated blood is pumping out of the heart with every single heartbeat.

CO2 Waveform: The CO2 Waveform helps with visualizing how much CO2 a patient is exhaling. Further, normal CO2 Waveforms are generally the shape of a round rectangle. IBP (1,2) Waveform: The IBP Waveform helps visualize the invasive blood pressure. Some patient monitors will show multiple waveforms.

How do I read my heart monitor results?

What the Numbers Mean – Heart rate: The hearts of healthy adults typically beat 60 to 100 times a minute. People who are more active can have slower heart rates. Blood pressure: This is a measure of the force on your arteries when your heart is beating (known as systolic pressure) and when it’s at rest (diastolic pressure).

  • The first number (systolic) should be between 100 and 130, and the second number (diastolic) should be between 60 and 80.
  • Temperature: Normal body temperature is usually thought to be 98.6 F, but it actually can be anywhere from just under 98 degrees F to a little over 99 without concern.
  • Respiration: A resting adult typically breathes 12 to 16 times a minute.

Oxygen saturation: This number measures how much oxygen is in your blood, on a scale up to 100. The number is normally 95 or higher, and anything below 90 means your body may not be getting enough oxygen.

What are the 3 readings on a hospital monitor?

What Are The 3 Readings On A Hospital Monitor? – It displays information about your heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature on the most basic monitors. A more advanced model may also determine the amount of oxygen in your blood and how quickly you breathe.

  1. A resting of 60 to 100 beats per minute can be considered normal.
  2. A fever can occur when a body temperature rises to 99F (37C).
  3. Normal oxygen levels are between 95 and 100.
  4. The systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher is considered a sign of high blood pressure.
  5. Electrocardiograms are used to record electrical activity in the heart.

A SpO2 waveform can be used to evaluate a patient’s blood flow. This is the wavy waveform of an ECG, usually blue, but sometimes red. By analyzing the waveform, the patient’s respiration rate can be determined. Low oxygen saturation is considered to be dangerous and must be investigated further.

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How do you read a hospital ICU monitor?

How to Read a Hospital Monitor: Understanding Vital Signs

  • Read the numbers on the right-hand side of the monitor to learn the patient’s pulse rate, body temperature, and blood pressure.
  • Use the respiratory and oxygen saturation rates to keep tabs on the patient’s breathing and circulatory system.
  • Watch the waveforms for any signs of irregular heartbeat or breathing.
  1. A normal resting pulse rate is between 60 and 100 beats per minute. This number is typically in the top right-hand corner of the monitor screen and tells you how fast the patient’s heart is beating. The number might go up when the patient sits up, talks, or moves around.
    • Someone who is injured or ill is likely to have a higher resting pulse rate than normal, but this is usually no cause for alarm. The monitor will issue an alert if the number gets too high.
    • Athletes who do a lot of cardiovascular training, such as cyclists or long-distance runners, might have a normal resting pulse rate of around 40 beats per minute.
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  1. The normal temperature range for adults is 97.8 to 99 °F (36.6 to 37.2 °C). This is typically the second number you’ll see on a patient monitor, directly under the pulse rate. A body temperature over 99 °F (37 °C) is considered a fever, while anything below 95 °F (35 °C) is considered hypothermia.
    • It’s normal for a patient’s body temperature to go up a degree or so if they’re eating or active. Their temperature might also go down a degree or two if they’re sleeping.
  1. Normal oxygen levels are between 95 and 100. This number is a percentage that tells you how much oxygen is in the patient’s blood. Even a little below 95 is usually okay, but the patient might require supplemental oxygen if the number drops below 90.
    • Oxygen saturation is typically monitored using a pulse oximeter, a small clip on the patient’s finger or toe.
    • The SpO2 number isn’t always displayed on a patient monitor, but you’ll usually see it if the patient is experiencing a respiratory condition, such as pneumonia or COVID-19.
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  1. The normal respiration rate for adults at rest is 12-16 breaths per minute. Quite simply, this is the number of breaths the patient takes in one minute. A patient’s respiration rate typically increases if they have a fever and might not be any cause for alarm. However, you do want to make sure the patient isn’t having any difficulty breathing.
    • If the patient seems to be having trouble breathing, such as if they’re gasping for breath or breathing very shallowly, press the call button to have a nurse come and evaluate their condition.
  1. Normal systolic blood pressure is between 90-120 mm Hg. This number, together with the diastolic blood pressure number, is typically found in the bottom-right corner of the screen. Systolic blood pressure tells you the amount of force exerted on the patient’s arteries at the moment when their heart is beating. High blood pressure occurs with systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or greater.
    • A patient’s systolic blood pressure is read together with their diastolic blood pressure—even though the numbers might appear separately, they’re expressed as a single unit.
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  1. Normal diastolic blood pressure is between 60-80 mm Hg. Diastolic blood pressure is the force exerted on the patient’s arteries between heartbeats, or when their heart is at rest. High blood pressure occurs with diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or greater.
    • When you read a patient’s blood pressure, express it as a ratio with the systolic blood pressure over the diastolic blood pressure. For example, if the monitor showed systolic blood pressure of 110 and diastolic blood pressure of 75, you’d say the patient’s blood pressure is “110 over 75.”
  1. An electrocardiogram (ECG) records the electrical activity of the heart. This is usually the top wavy line on the hospital monitor. You can think of it as an image of the pulse rate, which is displayed right next to it. Healthcare practitioners study extensively to learn how to read and interpret an ECG waveform. As the loved one of a patient, all you really need to know is that each spike or peak corresponds to a heartbeat. If the patient has a regular heartbeat, these spikes will occur the same number of little blocks apart from each other.
    • The ECG on a patient’s hospital monitor typically comes from lead II, electrodes attached to the patient’s right arm and left leg. If the ECG shows any irregularities, doctors or nurses will confirm the issue by attaching additional leads.
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  1. Use the SpO2 waveform to monitor the patient’s blood flow. The SpO2 waveform is the wavy line under the ECG waveform, usually blue but sometimes red. As long as each crest on the SpO2 waveform matches up with a spike on the ECG right above it, you can rest assured that oxygenated blood is circulating efficiently with each heartbeat.
    • Like the ECG, healthcare professionals undergo a lot of training to learn how to interpret these waveforms. It helps them see how well the heart is pumping blood, particularly to the patient’s extremities.
  1. The respiration waveform shows how well the patient is breathing. Most patient monitors don’t have a respiration waveform, but it’ll be there if they have respiratory issues. This is the wavy line at the bottom of the screen and is usually yellow or white.
    • Doctors and nurses use this waveform to identify apnea (when the patient suddenly stops breathing) or dyspnea (when the patient has difficulty breathing).
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Advertisement This article was medically reviewed by and by wikiHow staff writer,, Danielle Jacks, MD is a Surgical Resident at Ochsner Clinic Foundation in New Orleans, Louisiana. She has over six years of experience in general surgery. She received her MD from Oregon Health and Science University in 2016. This article has been viewed 183,970 times.

  • Co-authors: 5
  • Updated: October 25, 2022
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Categories: | Medical Disclaimer The content of this article is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, examination, diagnosis, or treatment. You should always contact your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional before starting, changing, or stopping any kind of health treatment.

Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 183,970 times. : How to Read a Hospital Monitor: Understanding Vital Signs

What is an abnormal heart rate number?

A normal resting heart rate for adults ranges from 60 to 100 beats per minute. Generally, a lower heart rate at rest implies more efficient heart function and better cardiovascular fitness. For example, a well-trained athlete might have a normal resting heart rate closer to 40 beats per minute.

  1. To measure your heart rate, simply check your pulse.
  2. Place your index and third fingers on your neck to the side of your windpipe.
  3. To check your pulse at your wrist, place two fingers between the bone and the tendon over your radial artery — which is located on the thumb side of your wrist.
  4. When you feel your pulse, count the number of beats in 15 seconds.

Multiply this number by four to calculate your beats per minute. Keep in mind that many factors can influence heart rate, including:

  • Age
  • Fitness and activity levels
  • Being a smoker
  • Having cardiovascular disease, high cholesterol or diabetes
  • Air temperature
  • Body position (standing up or lying down, for example)
  • Emotions
  • Body size
  • Medications

Although there’s a wide range of normal, an unusually high or low heart rate may indicate an underlying problem. Consult your doctor if your resting heart rate is consistently above 100 beats a minute (tachycardia) or if you’re not a trained athlete and your resting heart rate is below 60 beats a minute (bradycardia) — especially if you have other signs or symptoms, such as fainting, dizziness or shortness of breath.

What does heart rate number over number mean?

What do the numbers mean? | Life Blood pressure is created by your heart pushing the blood through your arteries and results in resistance created by the walls of your blood vessels. The play between the pressure generated by your heart and the resistance of the blood vessels determines your blood pressure level.

  • Your heart is an enormously powerful pump, which can force blood into openings too small to see.
  • Your blood pressure increases and decreases according to the needs placed on it.
  • This enables you to play a vigorous game of tennis and then to get a good night’s sleep.
  • The terminology If your blood pressure is recorded as 120/80, the number on top is the systolic pressure, and the bottom number the diastolic.

It is measured in millimeters of mercury.120/80mmHg also happens to be the, Systolic pressure is the pressure generated by each heartbeat. This occurs during the contraction of the heart muscle, which is called a systole. Diastolic blood pressure is the pressure between the heartbeats when the heart is resting.

  1. Systolic pressure is obviously always higher than diastolic blood pressure.
  2. Pulse pressure is the difference between the two readings.
  3. If any of these are significantly elevated, it increases the risk for heart disease, stroke or kidney damage.
  4. If your systolic pressure is 130 and your diastolic pressure is 90, it will be written as 130/90 or referred to as “one-thirty over ninety.” Blood pressure works in the same way as putting your thumb over a hosepipe: the narrower the aperture, the higher the pressure.

But pressure also decreases the further away from the heart it’s measured. So how do you get a uniform reading? Blood pressure is measured using a, It consists of a cuff that’s wrapped around your arm, then inflated to put pressure on the arm and on the brachial artery that runs the length of the limb.

This is linked to a column of mercury with precisely calibrated numbers. Combining the pressure and listening to your heart rate gives your healthcare professional a clear idea of your blood pressure. Listening to the heartbeat while deflating the pumped up cuff, he or she watches the mercury fall. When the heartbeat becomes audible, it means the pressure is just not high enough to cut off the blood flow in your brachial artery.

The point at which this happens is measured and is counted as your systolic pressure.

Releasing the pressure even more, your healthcare professional listens for when the heartbeat disappears again, which provides a reading of your diastolic pressure.- (Mari Hudson, Health24, updated February 2012)

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What is abnormal heart reading?

About – Each year millions of people experience abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), which are common as we age. For most, a normal resting heart rate is 60 to 100 beats per minute (bpm). For athletic individuals, a normal resting heart rate may be as low as 40 to 60 bpm.

Abnormal heart rhythms can be described as a heart beating too fast (above 100 bpm) or slow (below 60 bpm), a fluttering sensation in the chest area or the skipping of a heart beat. When electrical impulses in the heart become too fast, too slow, or irregular they cause the heart to beat irregularly.

Abnormal heart rhythms may cause the heart to pump blood inefficiently causing poor blood circulation in the body. As a result, less oxygen reaches other parts of the body and can cause organ damage. In most cases, abnormal heart rhythms are harmless, however, some cases may cause uncomfortable symptoms like dizziness, palpitations, pounding in the chest, fainting, shortness of breath, weakness, or fatigue.

What does AFIB look like on a heart monitor?

– Share on Pinterest An EKG displays P Waves, T Waves, and the QRS Complex. These may have abnormalities in people with A-fib. A “normal” EKG is one that shows what is known as sinus rhythm. Sinus rhythm may look like a lot of little bumps, but each relays an important action in the heart.

P Waves : P waves are the first “bump” on the EKG. They represent the time when the atria, the upper chambers of the heart, are squeezing blood through the heart. QRS Complex : The QRS complex is when the ventricles, the lower chambers of the heart, contract. This will distribute blood throughout the body. T Waves : The T wave comes after each QRS complex and represents the brief moment when the heart relaxes before starting to squeeze again.

When a person has a normal sinus rhythm on their EKG, these beats are in a regular, orderly rhythm. Each should look like the previous and will be as evenly spaced with each other. An EKG of a person with A-fib is very different in its appearance when compared with sinus rhythm. While there are variations on an A-fib EKG, some examples of these variations include:

Absence of P waves : The atria typically contract due to a signal, which appears as the “P” wave that an EKG measures. When a person has A-fib, the atria don’t usually contract from this signal, so a doctor won’t usually view P waves before a QRS. Irregular rhythm : People with A-fib sometimes have a rhythm that is described as “irregularly irregular.” The rhythm isn’t even, like sinus rhythm, but it has a pattern to it. This irregular rhythm is what can lead to heart palpitations and other A-fib symptoms. Fibrillatory waves : Some people with A-fib will have fibrillatory waves on their EKG. These waves are a sign of the atria pulsing out of time. Fibrillatory waves can look a lot like P waves, and this can make an A-fib rhythm look like sinus rhythm. However, an A-fib rhythm is usually irregular while sinus rhythm is consistent and even.

When an EKG measures how many beats per minute, the device is measuring how many times the ventricle beats each minute, or the number of QRS complexes. Because an A-fib rhythm can change from beat to beat, an EKG in real time may read varying numbers, such as 72 to 84 to 60 all within the span of several seconds.

How do you read an ECG monitor?

How to identify heart attack through ECG? – Normal ECG obtained from ECG heart monitor looks like a smooth curve. The distance between each spike is almost constant. Each spike represents one whole heartbeat, the distance between spikes represents your heart rate.

What are 5 vital signs that must be monitored?

Why You Should Be Checking Vitals – These vital signs are potentially far more important than you think. Professional medical monitoring is not always enough. Regular monitoring of your pulse rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, weight, and temperature gives you the upper hand on your health, and will pay off tremendously.

Monitoring these vitals gives you the ability to communicate accurate measurements to your doctor, detect early signs of underlying health issues, and personally monitor your everyday health. Normal adult vital signs will vary depending on one’s activity level and health. Knowing what is normal for you will only help you to perceive what is considered healthy or unhealthy.

: Medical Monitoring: 5 Vital Signs You Should Be Checking Regularly

What is normal resp on a hospital monitor?

What is the respiration rate? – The respiration rate is the number of breaths a person takes per minute. The rate is usually measured when a person is at rest and simply involves counting the number of breaths for one minute by counting how many times the chest rises.

What is ECG on hospital monitor?

Overview – An electrocardiogram records the electrical signals in the heart. It’s a common and painless test used to quickly detect heart problems and monitor the heart’s health. An electrocardiogram — also called ECG or EKG — is often done in a health care provider’s office, a clinic or a hospital room.

What is RPM on hospital monitor?

In its simplest form, RPM involves the use of connected electronic tools to record personal health and medical data in one location that is reviewed by a provider at a different location. The data may or may not be viewed as soon as it is transmitted.

What does a normal heart rate look like on a monitor?

What the Numbers Mean: – Various patient monitors can record and track a wide array of information, but almost all patient monitors will record these key vital signs: Heart Rate (HR): Typically, the heart rate is presented at the top of the monitor in green. The number will be identified by a “HR” or “PR” (pulse rate) beside or just above it and is presented in beats per minute (bpm). A normal adult has a resting heart rate between 60-100 bpm.

  1. Blood Pressure (BP): The patient’s blood pressure is typically presented on the screen under “SYST” or “SYS” for systolic and “DIAS” or “DIA” for diastolic.
  2. An average BP is around 120/80.
  3. Oxygen Saturation (SpO2): The patient’s oxygen saturation will be located on the monitor under “SpO2” and is a measure of the amount of oxygen in the patient’s blood.

A normal O2 saturation is 95% or greater; however, it is important to remember that some populations such as those with COPD have a lower normal cutoff. Respiratory Rate (RR): Look for the patient’s respiratory rate under “RR” on the patient monitor. It is reported in breaths per minute, with normal values between 12 and 20.