How To Treat Pcos Naturally To Get Periods?

How To Treat Pcos Naturally To Get Periods
When to Seek Help? – Though irregular menstrual cycles are a common symptom of PCOS, it is necessary to know when to consult a doctor or seek expert advice, including the following situations:

  • When you suspect you are pregnant
  • When your periods are late by more than three months
  • When you experience bleeding in between your menstrual cycles
  • When you suddenly experience heavy bleeding.

Also read: Curing PCOS at home Eating certain foods such as papaya, pomegranate, ginger, parsley and other Vitamin C-rich foods among others can definitely induce periods. Yoga and regular exercise as per your individual capacity also helps. Even a quick massage on your lower abdomen gets the uterine blood flowing and could lead to your menstrual cycle’s arrival.

How can I kick start my period with PCOS?

Irregular or absent periods – The contraceptive pill may be recommended to induce regular periods, or periods may be induced using an intermittent course of progestogen tablets (which are usually given every 3 to 4 months, but can be given monthly). This will also reduce the long-term risk of developing cancer of the womb lining (endometrial cancer) associated with not having regular periods.

How long can PCOS delay your period?

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)? – A key sign of PCOS is irregular periods or missed periods. The effects of PCOS on the ovaries can make a girl stop ovulating. PCOS cannot be diagnosed until 2–3 years after a girl’s first menstrual cycle because it can take up to 2 years after a first period for any girl’s cycle to become regular.

  1. Still, many girls with PCOS can get pregnant if they have sex.
  2. So if you’re sexually active, use condoms every time you have sex to avoid becoming pregnant or getting a sexually transmitted disease (STD),
  3. Of course, this is important whether you have PCOS or not.) Imbalanced hormone levels can cause changes in a girl’s entire body, not just her ovaries.

So doctors also look for these other signs of PCOS:

weight gain, obesity, or difficulty maintaining a normal weight, especially when the extra weight is concentrated around the waist a condition called hirsutism (pronounced: HER-suh-tiz-um), where a girl grows extra hair on her face, chest, abdomen, nipple area, or back (a little of this is normal for most girls, though) thinning hair on the head ( alopecia ) acne and clogged pores darkened, thickened skin around the neck, armpits, or breasts (this is called acanthosis nigricans ), which is a sign of insulin resistance high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes mellitus (high blood sugar levels)

Girls who show signs of puberty early — such as developing underarm or pubic hair before age 8 — may be at greater risk for PCOS later on.

Will my period come back PCOS?

Will My Monthly Cycle Go Back to Normal With PCOS Treatment? I have not had my period in over a year and my doctor said I have polycystic ovary syndrome. Will I get a regular cycle after I’ve been treated? – Elaina* Yes, your cycle should go back to normal with treatment.

Teen girls get for many different reasons, including health conditions — like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) — that cause changes in hormones. When a girl has, her ovaries produce higher than normal amounts of hormones called androgens. These androgens can interfere with the egg development and release that are part of a girl’s normal menstrual cycle.

There are several ways to treat PCOS. If a girl is, weight loss can sometimes get hormone levels back to normal. Doctors also might prescribe medicines to lower androgen levels. How PCOS is treated all depends on the girl and her unique body chemistry.

Sometimes doctors may try different treatments before landing on the right one. So work with your doctor and go to all follow-up appointments. That way, your doc will be up to date about how you’re feeling, how well a medicine is working, and what your cycle is doing. *Names have been changed to protect user privacy.

: Will My Monthly Cycle Go Back to Normal With PCOS Treatment?

What to do if periods are not coming?

When to see your GP – See your GP if you’re not pregnant – you’ve had a negative pregnancy test – and you’ve missed more than 3 periods in a row. If you’re sexually active and you have not taken a pregnancy test, your GP may advise you to take one. They may also ask you about:

your medical historyyour family’s medical historyyour sexual historyany emotional issues you’re havingany recent changes in your weightthe amount of exercise you do

Your GP may recommend waiting to see whether your periods return on their own. In some cases you may need treatment for your periods to return. You should also see your GP if your periods stop before you’re 45 or if you’re still bleeding when you’re over 55.

What pills is good for PCOS?

Medications for Manifestations of PCOS – Treatments for hirsutism in women with PCOS are similar to those in women without PCOS, such as patients with idiopathic hirsutism. There are many nonpharmacologic treatment options, including electrolysis, waxing, bleaching, plucking, depilatory creams (a form of hair removal that dissolves the hair), thermolysis (use of heat), and laser therapy.

Several medications have been studied for the treatment of hirsutism in women with PCOS. First-line agents include spironolactone (Aldactone) 22, 23, 28 – 30 and metformin, 13, 16, 20, 22, 31 – 33 as well as eflornithine (Vaniqa) for facial hirsutism.9 Combination oral contraceptives, especially those with progestins of norgestimate, desogestrel, or drospirenone (because of their low androgenic effects), are among the most commonly used medications for hirsutism in women with PCOS.2 However, they are not approved by the U.S.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for this use. One study found that women taking desogestrel/ethinyl estradiol (Apri) had lower hirsutism scores on a standardized scale (i.e., the Ferriman-Gallwey hirsutism score).34 Finasteride (Propecia) and flutamide (formerly Eulexin) are effective, but are FDA pregnancy categories X and D, respectively; the use of these agents for hirsutism is strictly off-label.2 Because of its antiandrogenic effects, spironolactone is effective, but not FDA-approved, for this indication.22, 23 A Cochrane review suggested that spironolactone is superior to finasteride.28 Combining spironolactone with oral contraceptives may be synergistic, but caution should be used in women taking drospirenone because each agent can cause hyperkalemia.2 Spironolactone is FDA pregnancy category C.

  • Insulin-sensitizing agents, including metformin, 31 acarbose (Precose), 24 and rosiglitazone (Avandia), 20 may be used to treat hirsutism in women with PCOS.
  • Spironolactone 22 and rosiglitazone 32 have been shown to be more effective than metformin, based on Ferriman-Gallwey hirsutism scores.
  • A Cochrane review suggested that metformin is as effective as oral contraceptives for treating hirsutism in women with PCOS, 33 but in contrast, a recent systematic review suggested that metformin is not effective.1 Topical eflornithine cream is FDA-approved for management of unwanted facial hair, but there are no published data regarding its use specifically in women with PCOS.

Sibutramine (Meridia), which is approved for obesity management, can also improve hirsutism.26 Hormonal aberrations in women with PCOS (e.g., elevated androgen levels) can cause menstrual irregularities (e.g., oligomenorrhea, amenorrhea, anovulatory cycles) that can lead to dysfunctional uterine bleeding and infertility.2 First-line agents for ovulation induction and treatment of infertility in patients with PCOS include metformin 8, 11, 15, 32, 35, 36 and clomiphene (Clomid), 6, 7 alone or in combination, as well as rosiglitazone.19, 20, 32 Clomiphene is an ovulation induction agent that has been used and studied in patients with and without PCOS.6 – 8, 15, 35, 36 Studies have found that letrozole (Femara) regulates ovulation and improves pregnancy rates in women with PCOS 6, 37, 38 ; however, this use is controversial because the drug is FDA pregnancy category D.

It is embryotoxic and fetotoxic in animal studies, and there are no studies in pregnant women. Insulin-sensitizing agents, including metformin, 11, 32 rosiglitazone, 19, 20, 32 and pioglitazone (Actos), 17 have been effective in improving fertility and ovulation in women with PCOS. There are contradictions in the literature regarding whether metformin, clomiphene, or a combination of the two agents is superior for improving pregnancy rates in women with PCOS.

A 2003 Cochrane review suggested that metformin should be a first-line treatment for infertility in women with PCOS.39 A more recent study confirmed that six months of metformin therapy was more effective than six months of clomiphene therapy for improving fertility in anovulatory, nonobese women with PCOS.8 However, a large randomized trial of more than 600 women found that clomiphene is superior to metformin in achieving live birth in infertile women with PCOS, with no statistical benefit to the addition of metformin to clomiphene.40 Another study also showed no benefit from adding metformin to clomiphene.35 However, two meta-analyses suggested that the combination is better than clomiphene alone.41, 42 A more recent study found that, although ovulation rates were better with metformin than with clomiphene, pregnancy rates were similar.43 Finally, two systematic reviews found conflicting results; one suggests metformin does not affect ovulation or pregnancy rates, 1 and the other suggests it does.44 The prevalence of insulin resistance in women with PCOS, as measured by impaired glucose tolerance, is substantially higher than expected compared with age-and weight-matched populations of women without PCOS.45 Although insulin resistance alone is a laboratory (not clinical) aberration, it can lead to diabetes, and it may be associated with the metabolic syndrome, thus leading to increased cardiovascular risk.2 As with diabetes, optimal treatment of PCOS requires lifestyle modifications (e.g., diet, exercise) in addition to appropriate medications.

  • Metformin improves insulin resistance, as diagnosed by elevated fasting glucose or fasting glucose/insulin ratios, in patients with PCOS, 10 – 16, 46, 47 and is probably the best agent to use.
  • Women with PCOS who are not obese may benefit more from metformin than women who are obese.13, 48 Metformin is FDA pregnancy category B.

Other insulin-sensitizing agents are also effective for improving insulin resistance in women with PCOS, including rosiglitazone 19 – 21 and pioglitazone.14, 17, 18 However, these agents may cause or worsen congestive heart failure, according to recent black box warnings, 27 or cause unwanted weight gain.

If a woman’s weight is excessive, the physician should be aggressive in championing a weight-loss program. Medications effective for weight loss (in addition to lifestyle modifications) that have been specifically studied in women with PCOS include metformin, acarbose, sibutramine, and orlistat (Xenical).

Metformin is probably the first-line medication for obesity or weight reduction in patients with PCOS. Metformin results in a decrease in body mass index (BMI) of 1 to 2 kg per m 2 or weight loss up to 6 lb, 10 oz to 8 lb, 13 oz (3 to 4 kg) 10, 46, 49 ; acarbose results in an approximate 3 kg per m 2 decrease in BMI 24 ; sibutramine results in a decrease in BMI of 5.8 kg per m 2 and weight loss of 31 lb, 11 oz (14.4 kg) 26 ; and orlistat results in weight loss of approximately 11 lb (5 kg).50 However, a recent systematic review suggested that metformin is not effective for lowering BMI in patients with PCOS.1 Anecdotally, oral contraceptives are among the most common agents used to treat menstrual irregularities in women with PCOS.

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Can you go a year without a period with PCOS?

Polycystic ovary syndrome How To Treat Pcos Naturally To Get Periods ovary syndrome (PCOS), also known as polycystic ovarian syndrome, is a common health problem caused by an imbalance of reproductive, The hormonal imbalance creates problems in the, The ovaries make the egg that is released each month as part of a healthy menstrual cycle.

  • Infertility (inability to get pregnant). In fact, PCOS is one of the most common causes of infertility in women.
  • Development of (small fluid-filled sacs) in the ovaries

Between 5% and 10% of women between 15 and 44, or during the years you can have children, have PCOS. Most women find out they have PCOS in their 20s and 30s, when they have problems getting pregnant and see their doctor. But PCOS can happen at any age after puberty.

  • Irregular menstrual cycle, Women with PCOS may miss periods or have fewer periods (fewer than eight in a year). Or, their periods may come every 21 days or more often. Some women with PCOS stop having menstrual periods.
  • Too much hair on the face, chin, or parts of the body where men usually have hair. This is called “hirsutism.” Hirsutism affects up to 70% of women with PCOS.
  • Acne on the face, chest, and upper back
  • Thinning hair or hair loss on the scalp; male-pattern baldness
  • Weight gain or difficulty losing weight
  • Darkening of skin, particularly along neck creases, in the groin, and underneath breasts
  • Skin tags, which are small excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area

The exact cause of PCOS is not known. Most experts think that several factors, including genetics, play a role:

  • High levels of, Androgens are sometimes called “male hormones,” although all women make small amounts of androgens. Androgens control the development of male traits, such as male-pattern baldness. Women with PCOS have more androgens than normal. Higher than normal androgen levels in women can prevent the ovaries from releasing an egg (ovulation) during each menstrual cycle, and can cause extra hair growth and acne, two signs of PCOS.
  • High levels of insulin. Insulin is a hormone that controls how the food you eat is changed into energy. Insulin resistance is when the body’s cells do not respond normally to insulin. As a result, your insulin blood levels become higher than normal. Many women with PCOS have insulin resistance, especially those who have overweight or obesity, have unhealthy eating habits, do not get enough physical activity, and have a family history of (usually type 2 diabetes). Over time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes.

Yes. Having PCOS does not mean you can’t get pregnant. PCOS is one of the most common, but treatable, causes of infertility in women. In women with PCOS, the hormonal imbalance interferes with the growth and release of eggs from the ovaries (ovulation).

  • Diabetes. More than half of women with PCOS will have diabetes or prediabetes (glucose intolerance) before the age of 40. Learn more about diabetes on our,
  • High blood pressure. Women with PCOS are at greater risk of having high blood pressure compared with women of the same age without PCOS. High blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. Learn more about,
  • Unhealthy cholesterol. Women with PCOS often have higher levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol and low levels of HDL (good) cholesterol. High cholesterol raises your risk of heart disease and stroke.
  • Sleep apnea. This is when momentary and repeated stops in breathing interrupt sleep. Many women with PCOS have overweight or obesity, which can cause sleep apnea. Sleep apnea raises your risk of heart disease and diabetes.
  • Depression and anxiety. and are common among women with PCOS.
  • Endometrial cancer. Problems with ovulation, obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes (all common in women with PCOS) increase the risk of developing cancer of the endometrium (lining of the uterus or womb).

Researchers do not know if PCOS causes some of these problems, if these problems cause PCOS, or if there are other conditions that cause PCOS and other health problems. Yes and no. PCOS affects many systems in the body. Many women with PCOS find that their menstrual cycles become more regular as they get closer to,

However, their PCOS hormonal imbalance does not change with age, so they may continue to have symptoms of PCOS. Also, the risks of PCOS-related health problems, such as diabetes, stroke, and heart attack, increase with age. These risks may be higher in women with PCOS than those without. There is no single test to diagnose PCOS.

To help diagnose PCOS and rule out other causes of your symptoms, your doctor may talk to you about your medical history and do a physical exam and different tests:

  • Physical exam. Your doctor will measure your blood pressure,, and waist size. They will also look at your skin for extra hair on your face, chest or back, acne, or skin discoloration. Your doctor may look for any hair loss or signs of other health conditions (such as an enlarged thyroid gland).
  • Pelvic exam. Your doctor may do a pelvic exam for signs of extra male hormones (for example, an enlarged clitoris) and check to see if your ovaries are enlarged or swollen.
  • Pelvic ultrasound (sonogram). This test uses sound waves to examine your ovaries for cysts and check the endometrium (lining of the uterus or womb).
  • Blood tests. Blood tests check your androgen hormone levels, sometimes called “male hormones.” Your doctor will also check for other hormones related to other common health problems that can be mistaken for PCOS, such as, Your doctor may also test your cholesterol levels and test you for diabetes.

Once other conditions are ruled out, you may be diagnosed with PCOS if you have at least two of the following symptoms:

  • Irregular periods, including periods that come too often, not often enough, or not at all
  • Signs that you have high levels of androgens:
    • Extra hair growth on your face, chin, and body (hirsutism)
    • Acne
    • Thinning of scalp hair
  • Higher than normal blood levels of androgens
  • Multiple cysts on one or both ovaries

There is no cure for PCOS, but you can manage the symptoms of PCOS. You and your doctor will work on a treatment plan based on your symptoms, your plans for having children, and your risk of long-term health problems such as diabetes and heart disease. Many women will need a combination of treatments, including:

  • to help relieve your symptoms

You can take steps at home to help your PCOS symptoms, including:

  • Losing weight. Healthy eating habits and regular physical activity can help relieve PCOS-related symptoms. Losing weight may help to lower your blood glucose levels, improve the way your body uses insulin, and help your hormones reach normal levels. Even a 10% loss in body weight (for example, a 150-pound woman losing 15 pounds) can help make your menstrual cycle more regular and improve your chances of getting pregnant. Learn more about,
  • Removing hair. You can try facial hair removal creams, laser hair removal, or electrolysis to remove excess hair. You can find hair removal creams and products at drugstores. Procedures like laser hair removal or electrolysis must be done by a doctor and may not be covered by health insurance.
  • Slowing hair growth. A prescription skin treatment (eflornithine HCl cream) can help slow down the growth rate of new hair in unwanted places.

The types of medicines that treat PCOS and its symptoms include:

  • Hormonal birth control, including the pill, patch, shot, vaginal ring, and hormone intrauterine device (IUD). For women who don’t want to get pregnant, hormonal can:
    • Make your menstrual cycle more regular
    • Lower your risk of
    • Help improve acne and reduce extra hair on the face and body (Ask your doctor about birth control with both estrogen and progesterone.)
  • Anti-androgen medicines. These medicines block the effect of androgens and can help reduce scalp hair loss, facial and body hair growth, and acne. They are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat PCOS symptoms. These medicines can also cause problems during pregnancy.
  • Metformin. Metformin is often used to treat type 2 diabetes and may help some women with PCOS symptoms. It is not approved by the FDA to treat PCOS symptoms. Metformin improves insulin’s ability to lower your blood sugar and can lower both insulin and androgen levels. After a few months of use, metformin may help restart ovulation, but it usually has little effect on acne and extra hair on the face or body. Recent research shows that metformin may have other positive effects, including lowering body mass and improving cholesterol levels.

You have several options to help your chances of getting pregnant if you have PCOS:

  • Losing weight. If you have overweight or obesity, losing weight through healthy eating and regular physical activity can help make your menstrual cycle more regular and improve your fertility. Find a personalized healthy eating plan using the tool.
  • Medicine. After ruling out other causes of infertility in you and your partner, your doctor might prescribe medicine to help you ovulate, such as clomiphene (Clomid).
  • In vitro fertilization (IVF). IVF may be an option if medicine does not work. In IVF, your egg is fertilized with your partner’s sperm in a laboratory and then placed in your uterus to implant and develop. Compared to medicine alone, IVF has higher pregnancy rates and better control over your risk of having twins and triplets (by allowing your doctor to transfer a single fertilized egg into your uterus).
  • Surgery. Surgery is also an option, usually only if the other options do not work. The outer shell (called the cortex ) of ovaries is thickened in women with PCOS and thought to play a role in preventing spontaneous ovulation. Ovarian drilling is a surgery in which the doctor makes a few holes in the surface of your ovary using lasers or a fine needle heated with electricity. Surgery usually restores ovulation, but only for 6 to 8 months.

Read more about, PCOS can cause problems during pregnancy for you and for your baby. Women with PCOS have higher rates of:

  • Miscarriage
  • Cesarean section (C-section)

Your baby also has a higher risk of being heavy (macrosomia) and of spending more time in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). You can lower your risk of problems during pregnancy by:

  • Reaching a healthy weight before you get pregnant. Use this to see your healthy weight before pregnancy and what to gain during pregnancy.
  • Reaching healthy blood sugar levels before you get pregnant. You can do this through a combination of healthy eating habits, regular physical activity, weight loss, and medicines such as metformin.
  • Taking, Talk to your doctor about how much folic acid you need.

Researchers continue to search for new ways to treat PCOS. Some current studies focus on:

  • Genetics and PCOS
  • Environmental exposure and PCOS risk
  • Ethnic and racial differences in PCOS symptoms
  • Medicines and supplements to restart ovulation
  • Obesity and its link to PCOS
  • Health risks for children of women with PCOS
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To learn more about current PCOS treatment studies, visit,

  1. Trivax, B., & Azziz, R. (2007)., Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, 50 (1), 168–177.
  2. Bremer, A.A. (2010)., Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, 8 (5), 375–394.
  3. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (2015).,
  4. Lorenz, L.B., & Wild, R.A. (2007)., Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, 50, 226–243.
  5. Goodman, N.F., Cobin, R.H., Futterweit, W., Glueck, J.S., Legro, R.S., & Carmina, E. (2015)., Endocrine Practice, 11, 1291–300.
  6. Boomsma, C.M., Fauser, B.C., & Macklon, N.S. (2008)., Seminars in Reproductive Medicine, 26, 72–84.

The Office on Women’s Health is grateful for the medical review by:

  • Violanda Grigorescu, M.D., M.S.P.H., Chief, Partnerships and Evaluation Branch, Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance, Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Torie Comeaux Plowden, M.D., M.P.H., Fellow, Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
  • Lubna Pal, M.B.B.S., M.R.C.O.G., M.S., F.A.C.O.G., Associate Professor, Director of the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Program, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine

All material contained on these pages are free of copyright restrictions and maybe copied, reproduced, or duplicated without permission of the Office on Women’s Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Citation of the source is appreciated. Page last updated: February 22, 2021 : Polycystic ovary syndrome

Can PCOS disappear naturally?

9. Is There a Cure? – There is currently no cure for PCOS, and it does not go away on its own. Even after menopause, women with PCOS often continue to have high levels of androgens as well as insulin resistance. This means that the health risks associated with PCOS are lifelong.

Can PCOS be cured without pills?

Myth #2: If You Lose Weight, You Can Get Rid of PCOS Unfortunately, there is no cure for PCOS, but overweight and obese women can help balance their hormone levels by losing weight. Otherwise, treatment is aimed at managing symptoms. A wide range of treatment options can help prevent any potential problems.

How do gynecologists check for PCOS?

There’s no single test for it, but a physical exam, ultrasound, and blood tests can help diagnose PCOS. You need to meet 2 of these 3 ‘official’ criteria to be diagnosed: Irregular, heavy, or missed periods due to missed ovulation—the release of an egg from your ovaries. This also keeps you from becoming pregnant.

How do I know my PCOS is getting better?

Here’s the list of signs that show you’re reversing PCOS – 1. Your periods cycle will start becoming regular; 2. The dark patches will start to reduce, and your skin will become clearer; 3. You will see a drastic change in your acne; 4. You will start losing weight; 5.

Why does PCOS stop periods?

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that causes irregular menstrual periods because monthly ovulation is not occurring and levels of androgens (male hormones) are elevated. The condition occurs in approximately 5 to 10 percent of women.

Which medicine is best for getting period?

pronounced as (me drox’ ee proe jes’ te rone) Medroxyprogesterone is used to treat abnormal menstruation (periods) or irregular vaginal bleeding. Medroxyprogesterone is also used to bring on a normal menstrual cycle in women who menstruated normally in the past but have not menstruated for at least 6 months and who are not pregnant or undergoing menopause (change of life).

  • Medroxyprogesterone is also used to prevent overgrowth of the lining of the uterus (womb) and may decrease the risk of cancer of the uterus in patients who are taking estrogen.
  • Medroxyprogesterone is in a class of medications called progestins.
  • It works by stopping the growth of the lining of the uterus and by causing the uterus to produce certain hormones.

Medroxyprogesterone comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once a day on certain days of a regular monthly cycle. To help you remember to take medroxyprogesterone, take it at around the same time every day on the days you are scheduled to take it.

Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take medroxyprogesterone exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor. Medroxyprogesterone may control your condition but will not cure it.

Continue to take medroxyprogesterone according to your monthly schedule even if you feel well. Do not stop taking medroxyprogesterone without talking to your doctor. This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Is it normal to miss periods for 3 months?

Three Months Without A Period May Not Be Normal Amenorrhea can be natural part of woman’s life, but should never be ignored DAYTON, Ohio (October 12, 2018) – A monthly menstrual cycle can be an unpleasant part of female life, but its regular visit plays an important role in a woman’s overall health. There are times when a normal menstrual cycle may cease to happen in a woman’s life.

  1. In some cases – such as pregnancy or the onset of perimenopause – it can be a natural part of life stages.
  2. Or there may be times in a woman’s life where her periods are deliberately stopped using medications under a physician’s supervision.
  3. While this is acceptable and healthy, it is not normal for a period to stop on its own without a reasonable explanation.

It can signal something more serious when a woman fails to have a period over a three month period. The condition, known as amenorrhea, can happen in two different phases. Primary amenorrhea refers to an adolescent who doesn’t begin menstruating during puberty.

  • This type of amenorrhea is rare in the United States.
  • Secondary amenorrhea, on the other hand, affects about 4 percent of women during their lifetime.
  • This type of amenorrhea is when a woman’s period starts, but then stops.
  • In most cases, this type of amenorrhea comes through natural changes in a woman’s body such as pregnancy or lactation.

However, there are cases when it signals something more is going on inside her body. “The impact amenorrhea has on a woman’s health is dependent on the root cause of it,” said Jennifer Schneidler, MD, an OB/Gyn physician with Magnolia Women’s Health. “Amenorrhea is not a disease itself but rather a sign of a health problem, and can happen for many reasons.” Because amenorrhea is associated with health conditions that are also linked to infertility, leading health organizations have made it an important part of their ongoing research, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

It’s link to infertility is also a reason women shouldn’t take amenorrhea lightly and should understand when it’s important to consult with their physician, said Dr. Schneidler, who practices with Premier Physician Network. The NIH details out the different causes for both primary and secondary amenorrhea reinforcing the importance of diagnosing it early.

Genetic abnormalities – Chromosomal or genetic abnormalities can cause the ovaries to stop functioning. Various abnormalities – including those characterized by high levels of testosterone – can delay or disrupt a girl’s menstruation. Hormonal dysfunction – Problems with the hypothalamus or pituitary gland in the brain can cause an imbalance in hormones that prevent a period from starting.

  1. Likewise, conditions such as eating disorders, excessive exercise and extreme physical or psychological stress can disrupt hormone function.
  2. Reproductive problems – Amenorrhea can happen when a woman’s reproductive organs are not functioning properly due to a blockage in their passageways.
  3. Birth control – Certain birth control pills, injectable contraceptives and hormonal intrauterine devices can cause amenorrhea.

It can often take several months after ceasing birth control for a woman to regain regular periods. Certain medication – Some medicines that treat conditions such as depression and high blood pressure can increase levels of hormones that prevent ovulation and a menstrual cycle.

  • Scar tissue – Scar tissue can often build up in a woman’s uterus following procedures such as a dilation and curettage may prohibit regular menstrual cycles. Dr.
  • Schneidler said girls who are 15 years of age and have had no signs of puberty, or 17-year-olds who have signs of puberty but no period, should consult with their physician.

Women who have started their period, but then do not experience one for at least three months, should also be evaluated. : Three Months Without A Period May Not Be Normal

Is missing your period for 2 months normal?

Perimenopause – If you’re entering perimenopause —the first stage of menopause —you may notice your periods occur more infrequently. The decrease in periods is caused by a decrease in the estrogen hormone. If you’re experiencing irregular periods, you’re not alone.

About nine to 14 percent of women in the United States are affected by menstrual irregularities. With the exception of missing your period while on some contraceptives, it is not normal to go without a period for several months and can be harmful to your health. Visit your physician if your missed periods persist.

Media contact: Dee Dee Grays, [email protected], 979.436.0611

Is it normal to not have a period for a year with PCOS?

If you experience symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), they’ll usually become apparent in your late teens or early 20s. Not all women with PCOS will have all of the symptoms, and each symptom can vary from mild to severe. Some women only experience menstrual problems or are unable to conceive, or both. Common symptoms of PCOS include:

irregular periods or no periods at all difficulty getting pregnant (because of irregular ovulation or no ovulation) excessive hair growth (hirsutism) – usually on the face, chest, back or buttocksweight gainthinning hair and hair loss from the headoily skin or acne

You should talk to your GP if you have any of these symptoms and think you may have PCOS.

How can I increase blood flow in PCOS?

Exercising more regularly – Exercise is one of the core recommendations in managing the symptoms of PCOS, and this applies to irregular periods too. While the direct impact of regular exercise on menstruation patterns and period pain is still an area of ongoing research, it can help to regulate periods by assisting with weight control.

Can you go a year without a period with PCOS?

Polycystic ovary syndrome How To Treat Pcos Naturally To Get Periods ovary syndrome (PCOS), also known as polycystic ovarian syndrome, is a common health problem caused by an imbalance of reproductive, The hormonal imbalance creates problems in the, The ovaries make the egg that is released each month as part of a healthy menstrual cycle.

  • Infertility (inability to get pregnant). In fact, PCOS is one of the most common causes of infertility in women.
  • Development of (small fluid-filled sacs) in the ovaries

Between 5% and 10% of women between 15 and 44, or during the years you can have children, have PCOS. Most women find out they have PCOS in their 20s and 30s, when they have problems getting pregnant and see their doctor. But PCOS can happen at any age after puberty.

  • Irregular menstrual cycle, Women with PCOS may miss periods or have fewer periods (fewer than eight in a year). Or, their periods may come every 21 days or more often. Some women with PCOS stop having menstrual periods.
  • Too much hair on the face, chin, or parts of the body where men usually have hair. This is called “hirsutism.” Hirsutism affects up to 70% of women with PCOS.
  • Acne on the face, chest, and upper back
  • Thinning hair or hair loss on the scalp; male-pattern baldness
  • Weight gain or difficulty losing weight
  • Darkening of skin, particularly along neck creases, in the groin, and underneath breasts
  • Skin tags, which are small excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area
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The exact cause of PCOS is not known. Most experts think that several factors, including genetics, play a role:

  • High levels of, Androgens are sometimes called “male hormones,” although all women make small amounts of androgens. Androgens control the development of male traits, such as male-pattern baldness. Women with PCOS have more androgens than normal. Higher than normal androgen levels in women can prevent the ovaries from releasing an egg (ovulation) during each menstrual cycle, and can cause extra hair growth and acne, two signs of PCOS.
  • High levels of insulin. Insulin is a hormone that controls how the food you eat is changed into energy. Insulin resistance is when the body’s cells do not respond normally to insulin. As a result, your insulin blood levels become higher than normal. Many women with PCOS have insulin resistance, especially those who have overweight or obesity, have unhealthy eating habits, do not get enough physical activity, and have a family history of (usually type 2 diabetes). Over time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes.

Yes. Having PCOS does not mean you can’t get pregnant. PCOS is one of the most common, but treatable, causes of infertility in women. In women with PCOS, the hormonal imbalance interferes with the growth and release of eggs from the ovaries (ovulation).

  • Diabetes. More than half of women with PCOS will have diabetes or prediabetes (glucose intolerance) before the age of 40. Learn more about diabetes on our,
  • High blood pressure. Women with PCOS are at greater risk of having high blood pressure compared with women of the same age without PCOS. High blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. Learn more about,
  • Unhealthy cholesterol. Women with PCOS often have higher levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol and low levels of HDL (good) cholesterol. High cholesterol raises your risk of heart disease and stroke.
  • Sleep apnea. This is when momentary and repeated stops in breathing interrupt sleep. Many women with PCOS have overweight or obesity, which can cause sleep apnea. Sleep apnea raises your risk of heart disease and diabetes.
  • Depression and anxiety. and are common among women with PCOS.
  • Endometrial cancer. Problems with ovulation, obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes (all common in women with PCOS) increase the risk of developing cancer of the endometrium (lining of the uterus or womb).

Researchers do not know if PCOS causes some of these problems, if these problems cause PCOS, or if there are other conditions that cause PCOS and other health problems. Yes and no. PCOS affects many systems in the body. Many women with PCOS find that their menstrual cycles become more regular as they get closer to,

However, their PCOS hormonal imbalance does not change with age, so they may continue to have symptoms of PCOS. Also, the risks of PCOS-related health problems, such as diabetes, stroke, and heart attack, increase with age. These risks may be higher in women with PCOS than those without. There is no single test to diagnose PCOS.

To help diagnose PCOS and rule out other causes of your symptoms, your doctor may talk to you about your medical history and do a physical exam and different tests:

  • Physical exam. Your doctor will measure your blood pressure,, and waist size. They will also look at your skin for extra hair on your face, chest or back, acne, or skin discoloration. Your doctor may look for any hair loss or signs of other health conditions (such as an enlarged thyroid gland).
  • Pelvic exam. Your doctor may do a pelvic exam for signs of extra male hormones (for example, an enlarged clitoris) and check to see if your ovaries are enlarged or swollen.
  • Pelvic ultrasound (sonogram). This test uses sound waves to examine your ovaries for cysts and check the endometrium (lining of the uterus or womb).
  • Blood tests. Blood tests check your androgen hormone levels, sometimes called “male hormones.” Your doctor will also check for other hormones related to other common health problems that can be mistaken for PCOS, such as, Your doctor may also test your cholesterol levels and test you for diabetes.

Once other conditions are ruled out, you may be diagnosed with PCOS if you have at least two of the following symptoms:

  • Irregular periods, including periods that come too often, not often enough, or not at all
  • Signs that you have high levels of androgens:
    • Extra hair growth on your face, chin, and body (hirsutism)
    • Acne
    • Thinning of scalp hair
  • Higher than normal blood levels of androgens
  • Multiple cysts on one or both ovaries

There is no cure for PCOS, but you can manage the symptoms of PCOS. You and your doctor will work on a treatment plan based on your symptoms, your plans for having children, and your risk of long-term health problems such as diabetes and heart disease. Many women will need a combination of treatments, including:

  • to help relieve your symptoms

You can take steps at home to help your PCOS symptoms, including:

  • Losing weight. Healthy eating habits and regular physical activity can help relieve PCOS-related symptoms. Losing weight may help to lower your blood glucose levels, improve the way your body uses insulin, and help your hormones reach normal levels. Even a 10% loss in body weight (for example, a 150-pound woman losing 15 pounds) can help make your menstrual cycle more regular and improve your chances of getting pregnant. Learn more about,
  • Removing hair. You can try facial hair removal creams, laser hair removal, or electrolysis to remove excess hair. You can find hair removal creams and products at drugstores. Procedures like laser hair removal or electrolysis must be done by a doctor and may not be covered by health insurance.
  • Slowing hair growth. A prescription skin treatment (eflornithine HCl cream) can help slow down the growth rate of new hair in unwanted places.

The types of medicines that treat PCOS and its symptoms include:

  • Hormonal birth control, including the pill, patch, shot, vaginal ring, and hormone intrauterine device (IUD). For women who don’t want to get pregnant, hormonal can:
    • Make your menstrual cycle more regular
    • Lower your risk of
    • Help improve acne and reduce extra hair on the face and body (Ask your doctor about birth control with both estrogen and progesterone.)
  • Anti-androgen medicines. These medicines block the effect of androgens and can help reduce scalp hair loss, facial and body hair growth, and acne. They are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat PCOS symptoms. These medicines can also cause problems during pregnancy.
  • Metformin. Metformin is often used to treat type 2 diabetes and may help some women with PCOS symptoms. It is not approved by the FDA to treat PCOS symptoms. Metformin improves insulin’s ability to lower your blood sugar and can lower both insulin and androgen levels. After a few months of use, metformin may help restart ovulation, but it usually has little effect on acne and extra hair on the face or body. Recent research shows that metformin may have other positive effects, including lowering body mass and improving cholesterol levels.

You have several options to help your chances of getting pregnant if you have PCOS:

  • Losing weight. If you have overweight or obesity, losing weight through healthy eating and regular physical activity can help make your menstrual cycle more regular and improve your fertility. Find a personalized healthy eating plan using the tool.
  • Medicine. After ruling out other causes of infertility in you and your partner, your doctor might prescribe medicine to help you ovulate, such as clomiphene (Clomid).
  • In vitro fertilization (IVF). IVF may be an option if medicine does not work. In IVF, your egg is fertilized with your partner’s sperm in a laboratory and then placed in your uterus to implant and develop. Compared to medicine alone, IVF has higher pregnancy rates and better control over your risk of having twins and triplets (by allowing your doctor to transfer a single fertilized egg into your uterus).
  • Surgery. Surgery is also an option, usually only if the other options do not work. The outer shell (called the cortex ) of ovaries is thickened in women with PCOS and thought to play a role in preventing spontaneous ovulation. Ovarian drilling is a surgery in which the doctor makes a few holes in the surface of your ovary using lasers or a fine needle heated with electricity. Surgery usually restores ovulation, but only for 6 to 8 months.

Read more about, PCOS can cause problems during pregnancy for you and for your baby. Women with PCOS have higher rates of:

  • Miscarriage
  • Cesarean section (C-section)

Your baby also has a higher risk of being heavy (macrosomia) and of spending more time in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). You can lower your risk of problems during pregnancy by:

  • Reaching a healthy weight before you get pregnant. Use this to see your healthy weight before pregnancy and what to gain during pregnancy.
  • Reaching healthy blood sugar levels before you get pregnant. You can do this through a combination of healthy eating habits, regular physical activity, weight loss, and medicines such as metformin.
  • Taking, Talk to your doctor about how much folic acid you need.

Researchers continue to search for new ways to treat PCOS. Some current studies focus on:

  • Genetics and PCOS
  • Environmental exposure and PCOS risk
  • Ethnic and racial differences in PCOS symptoms
  • Medicines and supplements to restart ovulation
  • Obesity and its link to PCOS
  • Health risks for children of women with PCOS

To learn more about current PCOS treatment studies, visit,

  1. Trivax, B., & Azziz, R. (2007)., Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, 50 (1), 168–177.
  2. Bremer, A.A. (2010)., Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, 8 (5), 375–394.
  3. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (2015).,
  4. Lorenz, L.B., & Wild, R.A. (2007)., Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, 50, 226–243.
  5. Goodman, N.F., Cobin, R.H., Futterweit, W., Glueck, J.S., Legro, R.S., & Carmina, E. (2015)., Endocrine Practice, 11, 1291–300.
  6. Boomsma, C.M., Fauser, B.C., & Macklon, N.S. (2008)., Seminars in Reproductive Medicine, 26, 72–84.

The Office on Women’s Health is grateful for the medical review by:

  • Violanda Grigorescu, M.D., M.S.P.H., Chief, Partnerships and Evaluation Branch, Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance, Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Torie Comeaux Plowden, M.D., M.P.H., Fellow, Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
  • Lubna Pal, M.B.B.S., M.R.C.O.G., M.S., F.A.C.O.G., Associate Professor, Director of the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Program, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine

All material contained on these pages are free of copyright restrictions and maybe copied, reproduced, or duplicated without permission of the Office on Women’s Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Citation of the source is appreciated. Page last updated: February 22, 2021 : Polycystic ovary syndrome