What Is Betnovate Cream Used To Treat?

What Is Betnovate Cream Used To Treat
What is BETNOVATE used for? BETNOVATE is used to treat various inflammatory skin conditions, including eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, insect bites and prickly heat. BETNOVATE belongs to a group of medicines known as corticosteroids, frequently called ‘steroids’.

Where should you not use betnovate?

BETNOVATE should not be used if you suffer from poor circulation of blood in the skin region, as it may result in skin ulcers. Occlusive dressings should not be used if you have a skin infection. BETNOVATE should not be used in children under the age of 1 year, unless advised by your doctor.

How long does it take for betnovate to work?

8. Common questions about betamethasone – How does betamethasone work? Betamethasone is a steroid (also called a corticosteroid ). Steroids help to reduce inflammation in the skin (and other parts of your body). Skin gets inflamed when an allergic reaction or irritation causes chemicals to be released in the skin.

  1. These make your blood vessels widen and your irritated skin becomes red, swollen, itchy and painful.
  2. Betamethasone skin treatments work on your skin’s cells to stop these chemicals being released.
  3. This reduces any swelling, redness and itching.
  4. When will my skin get better? Your skin should start to get better after using betamethasone for a few days.

If you’re using cream, ointment or lotion, speak to your doctor if there is no improvement after 4 weeks, or if your skin gets worse at any time. Ask your doctor how long it should take to show an improvement if you are using the scalp foam or are using betamethasone on your face.

  • They will tell you what to do if it does not work.
  • How long can I use betamethasone skin treatments for? For long-term skin problems, such as eczema or psoriasis, you may need to use the skin treatments for a week or two, or sometimes for longer.
  • To reduce the risk of side effects, your doctor may recommend that you only use betamethasone skin treatments for a few weeks at a time or for a day or two each week.

Tell your doctor if your skin gets worse or does not improve within 2 to 4 weeks. Once your skin is better, you can use moisturisers to keep it from becoming inflamed again. Do not use betamethasone skin cream, ointment or lotion for more than 4 weeks without talking to your doctor.

If you need treatment for a long time, they may decide you need to use a milder cream or ointment. Talk to your doctor before stopping treatment if you’ve been using betamethasone for a long time. They may tell you to gradually use less of it, and use it less often, before you stop completely. This reduces the chance of your symptoms coming back.

Is it safe to use for a long time? Using betamethasone for a long time without stopping can mean some of the medicine gets into your bloodstream. If this happens, there’s a very small chance it can cause serious side effects, such as adrenal gland problems, high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia), thinning of your skin, or problems with your eyesight.

If you have been using betamethasone for a long time, your doctor may tell you to gradually reduce the amount you use before stopping completely. Can I use betamethasone skin treatments on my face? Do not use betamethasone skin products on your face unless a doctor has told you to. The skin on your face is delicate, so if betamethasone skin treatments thin the skin or damage it, it’s particularly noticeable.

If your doctor tells you that you can use betamethasone on your face, follow their instructions carefully. Do not put betamethasone near your eyes or on your eyelids. How does betamethasone compare with other steroids? There’s a range of skin treatments available that contain different steroids.

  • mild
  • moderate
  • potent
  • very potent

Most betamethasone skin treatments are potent. Your doctor will choose a steroid skin treatment for you based on the strength you need to treat your condition. A mild or moderate strength treatment is used for most skin conditions. Potent skin treatments are usually used for short periods of time for severe skin conditions.

  • Usually you will have tried a lower strength steroid skin treatment first before you try betamethasone.
  • The stronger (or more potent) the steroid is, the better it will work.
  • However, with stronger steroids there’s also more risk of side effects.
  • All steroids have the same side effects but you’re less likely to get them with milder steroid skin products.

Can steroids make eczema worse? Steroids like betamethasone reduce inflammation in your skin to help manage your symptoms. They do not cure the eczema. If you feel your symptoms are getting worse after using betamethasone for 1 week, it’s important to tell a doctor.

When you stop using betamethasone skin treatments, skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis can flare up again. You can avoid this by gradually reducing the amount you put on, and how often you use it. Do this over 1 to 2 weeks before stopping it completely. Can I still have vaccinations? Using betamethasone does not stop you or your child having vaccinations.

But tell the doctor or nurse that you’re using betamethasone skin treatments so they can give the vaccine in an untreated area of skin. Can I drink alcohol with it? Yes, you can drink alcohol while using betamethasone. Is there any food or drink I need to avoid? No.

Which betnovate cream is good for skin?

In Treatment of Skin conditions with inflammation & itching – Betnovate-C Cream is effective in treating skin conditions with inflammation and itching such as eczema, dermatitis, and psoriasis. It works by reducing the actions of chemicals in the body that cause inflammation of the skin.

When used correctly it is a safe and effective treatment. It reduces the redness, rash, pain, or itchiness caused by your skin’s reaction to an irritant. It thus improves your self-esteem and confidence as your appearance changes. You should always use it as prescribed and only apply the amount you have been told to.

Keep using it for as long as it is prescribed to get the full benefits. show more show less

Is betnovate good for fungal infection?

Medicinal Benefits – Betnovate C Cream 30 gm is a combination of two drugs, namely: Betamethasone and Clioquinol. Betnovate C Cream 30 gm is used to treat fungal and bacterial infections of the skin, thereby reducing swelling, itching and redness caused due to certain skin problems.

  • Betamethasone is a corticosteroid that acts inside skin cells and inhibits the release of certain chemical messengers in the body that cause redness, itching and swelling.
  • When the skin reacts to any allergens, such chemicals are released normally.
  • Clioquinol is an antifungal agent with additional antibacterial action.

It works by inhibiting the growth and multiplication of fungi and bacteria.

Is betnovate cream Good for infection?

A: Betnovate-N Cream is used to treat various conditions of skin inflammation with a secondary bacterial infection such as dermatitis, eczema and psoriasis.

Is betnovate a strong cream?

Betnovate cream and ointment – Betnovate is a potent steroid for once or twice daily treatment to moderately severe eczema, on the body, arms and legs. It is manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline and contains the active ingredient betamethasone valerate 0.1%. Betnovate is available from Dr Fox as a cream or an ointment and is also known as Betnovate C.

How often can you apply betnovate cream?

This information is intended for use by health professionals Betnovate Cream Betamethasone Valerate BP 0.122% W / W Excipients with known effect: Chlorocresol Cetostearyl alcohol For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1 Aqueous Cream Betamethasone valerate is a potent topical corticosteroid indicated for adults, elderly and children over 1 year for the relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of steroid responsive dermatoses. These include the following: Atopic dermatitis (including infantile atopic dermatitis) Nummular dermatitis (discoid eczema) Prurigo nodularis Psoriasis (excluding widespread plaque psoriasis) Lichen simplex chronicus (neurodermatitis) and lichen planus Seborrhoeic dermatitis Irritant or allergic contact dermatitis Discoid lupus erythematosus Adjunct to systemic steroid therapy in generalised erythroderma Insect bite reactions Route of administration: Cutaneous Creams are especially appropriate for moist or weeping surfaces. Apply thinly and gently rub in using only enough to cover the entire affected area once or twice daily for up to 4 weeks until improvement occurs, then reduce the frequency of application or change the treatment to a less potent preparation. Allow adequate time for absorption after each application before applying an emollient. In the more resistant lesions, such as the thickened plaques of psoriasis on elbows and knees, the effect of betamethasone valerate can be enhanced, if necessary, by occluding the treatment area with polythene film. Overnight occlusion only is usually adequate to bring about a satisfactory response in such lesions; thereafter, improvement can usually be maintained by regular application without occlusion. If the condition worsens or does not improve within 2-4 weeks, treatment and diagnosis should be re-evaluated. Therapy with betamethasone valerate should be gradually discontinued once control is achieved and an emollient continued as maintenance therapy. Rebound of pre-existing dermatoses can occur with abrupt discontinuation of betamethasone valerate. Recalcitrant dermatoses Patients who frequently relapse Once an acute episode has been treated effectively with a continuous course of topical corticosteroid, intermittent dosing (apply once a day twice a week without occlusion) may be considered. This has been shown to be helpful in reducing the frequency of relapse. Application should be continued to all previously affected sites or to known sites of potential relapse. This regimen should be combined with routine daily use of emollients. The condition and the benefits and risks of continued treatment must be re-evaluated on a regular basis. Paediatric population Betamethasone valerate is contraindicated in children under one year of age. Children are more likely to develop local and systemic side effects of topical corticosteroids and, in general, require shorter courses and less potent agents than adults; therefore, courses should be limited to five days and occlusion should not be used. Care should be taken when using betamethasone valerate to ensure the amount applied is the minimum that provides therapeutic benefit. Elderly Clinical studies have not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. The greater frequency of decreased hepatic or renal function in the elderly may delay elimination if systemic absorption occurs. Therefore the minimum quantity should be used for the shortest duration to achieve the desired clinical benefit. Renal / Hepatic Impairment In case of systemic absorption (when application is over a large surface area for a prolonged period) metabolism and elimination may be delayed therefore increasing the risk of systemic toxicity. Therefore the minimum quantity should be used for the shortest duration to achieve the desired clinical benefit. Hypersensitivity to the active substance or any of the excipients in the excipients listed in section 6.1. The following conditions should not be treated with betamethasone valerate: • Untreated cutaneous infections o Rosacea o Acne vulgaris o Pruritus without inflammation o Perianal and genital pruritus o Perioral dermatitis Betamethasone valerate is contraindicated in dermatoses in infants under one year of age, including dermatitis Betamethasone valerate should be used with caution in patients with a history of local hypersensitivity to other corticosteroids. Local hypersensitivity reactions ( see section 4.8) may resemble symptoms of the condition under treatment. Manifestations of hypercortisolism (Cushing’s syndrome) and reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, leading to glucocorticosteroid insufficiency, can occur in some individuals as a result of increased systemic absorption of topical steroids. If either of the above are observed, withdraw the drug gradually by reducing the frequency of application, or by substituting a less potent corticosteroid. Abrupt withdrawal of treatment may result in glucocorticosteroid insufficiency (see section 4.8). Risk factors for increased systemic effects are: o Potency and formulation of topical steroid o Duration of exposure o Application to a large surface area o Use on occluded areas of skin e.g. on intertriginous areas or under occlusive dressings (in infants the nappy may act as an occlusive dressing) o Increasing hydration of the stratum corneum o Use on thin skin areas such as the face o Use on broken skin or other conditions where the skin barrier may be impaired o In comparison with adults, children may absorb proportionally larger amounts of topical corticosteroids and thus be more susceptible to systemic adverse effects. This is because children have an immature skin barrier and a greater surface area to body weight ratio compared with adults. Paediatric population In infants and children under 12 years of age, treatment courses should be limited to five days and occlusion should not be used; long-term continuous topical corticosteroid therapy should be avoided where possible, as adrenal suppression can occur. Infection risk with occlusion Bacterial infection is encouraged by the warm, moist conditions within skin folds or caused by occlusive dressings. When using occlusive dressings, the skin should be cleansed before a fresh dressing is applied. Use in Psoriasis Topical corticosteroids should be used with caution in psoriasis as rebound relapses, development of tolerances, risk of generalised pustular psoriasis and development of local or systemic toxicity due to impaired barrier function of the skin have been reported in some cases. If used in psoriasis careful patient supervision is important. Application to the face Prolonged application to the face is undesirable as this area is more susceptible to atrophic changes; therefore, treatment courses should be limited to five days and occlusion should not be used. Application to the eyelids If applied to the eyelids, care is needed to ensure that the preparation does not enter the eye, as cataract and glaucoma might result from repeated exposure. Visual disturbance Visual disturbance may be reported with systemic and topical corticosteroid use. If a patient presents with symptoms such as blurred vision or other visual disturbances, the patient should be considered for referral to an ophthalmologist for evaluation of possible causes which may include cataract, glaucoma or rare diseases such as central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) which have been reported after use of systemic and topical corticosteroids. Concomitant infection Appropriate antimicrobial therapy should be used whenever treating inflammatory lesions which have become infected. Any spread of infection requires withdrawal of topical corticosteroid therapy and administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Chronic leg ulcers Topical corticosteroids are sometimes used to treat the dermatitis around chronic leg ulcers. However, this use may be associated with a higher occurrence of local hypersensitivity reactions and an increased risk of local infection. Flammability risk Product contains paraffin. Instruct patients not to smoke or go near naked flames due to the risk of severe burns. Fabric (clothing, bedding, dressings etc) that has been in contact with this product burns more easily and is a serious fire hazard. Washing clothing and bedding may reduce product build-up but not totally remove it. Betnovate contains chlorocresol which may cause allergic reactions and cetostearyl alcohol which may cause local skin reactions (e.g. contact dermatitis). Topical steroid withdrawal syndrome Long term continuous or inappropriate use of topical steroids can result in the development of rebound flares after stopping treatment (topical steroid withdrawal syndrome). A severe form of rebound flare can develop which takes the form of a dermatitis with intense redness, stinging and burning that can spread beyond the initial treatment area. It is more likely to occur when delicate skin sites such as the face and flexures are treated. Should there be a reoccurrence of the condition within days to weeks after successful treatment a withdrawal reaction should be suspected. Reapplication should be with caution and specialist advise is recommended in these cases or other treatment options should be considered. Co-administered drugs that can inhibit CYP3A4 (e.g. ritonavir, itraconazole) have been shown to inhibit the metabolism of corticosteroids leading to increased systemic exposure. The extent to which this interaction is clinically relevant depends on the dose and route of administration of the corticosteroids and the potency of the CYP3A4 inhibitor. Fertility There are no data in humans to evaluate the effect of topical corticosteroids on fertility. Pregnancy There are limited data from the use of betamethasone valerate in pregnant women. Topical administration of corticosteroids to pregnant animals can cause abnormalities of foetal development. ( see section 5.3 ). The relevance of this finding to humans has not been established; however, administration of betamethasone valerate during pregnancy should only be considered if the expected benefit to the mother outweighs the risk to the foetus. The minimum quantity should be used for the minimum duration. Lactation The safe use of topical corticosteroids during lactation has not been established. It is not known whether topical administration of corticosteroids could result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable amounts in breast milk. Administration of betamethasone valerate during lactation should only be considered if the expected benefit to the mother outweighs the risk to the infant. If used during lactation betamethasone valerate should not be applied to the breasts to avoid accidental ingestion by the infant. There have been no studies to investigate the effect of betamethasone valerate on driving performance or the ability to operate machinery. A detrimental effect on such activities would not be anticipated from the adverse reaction profile of topical betamethasone valerate, Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are listed below by MedDRA system organ class and by frequency. Frequencies are defined as: very common (≥1/10), common (≥1/100 and <1/10), uncommon (≥1/1,000 and <1/100), rare (≥1/10,000 and <1/1,000) very rare (<1/10,000), including isolated reports and not known (cannot be estimated from available data), Post-marketing data

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Infections and Infestations
Very rare Opportunistic infection
Immune System Disorders
Very rare Hypersensitivity, generalised rash
Endocrine Disorders
Very rare Hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis suppression Cushingoid features (e.g. moon face, central obesity), delayed weight gain/growth retardation in children, osteoporosis, glaucoma, hyperglycaemia/glucosuria, cataract, hypertension, increased weight/obesity, decreased endogenous cortisol levels, alopecia, trichorrhexis
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders
Common Pruritus, local skin burning /skin pain
Very rare Allergic contact dermatitis /dermatitis, erythema, rash, urticaria, pustular psoriasis, skin thinning* / skin atrophy*, skin wrinkling*, skin dryness*, striae*, telangiectasias*, pigmentation changes*, hypertrichosis, exacerbation of underlying symptoms
Not known Withdrawal reactions – redness of the skin which may extend to areas beyond the initial affected area, burning or stinging sensation, itch, skin peeling, oozing pustules. (see section 4.4)
General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions
Very rare Application site irritation/pain
*Skin features secondary to local and/or systemic effects of hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis suppression. Eye disorders
Not known Vision, blurred (see also section 4.4)

Reporting of suspected reactions: Reporting suspected adverse reactions after authorisation of the medicinal product is important. It allows continued monitoring of the benefit/risk balance of the medicinal product. Healthcare professionals are asked to report any suspected adverse reactions via the Yellow Card Scheme at: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard or search for MHRA Yellow Card in the Google Play or Apple App Store.

Symptoms and signs Topically applied betamethasone valerate may be absorbed in sufficient amounts to produce systemic effects. Acute overdosage is very unlikely to occur, however, in the case of chronic overdosage or misuse the features of hypercortisolism may occur ( see section 4.8), Treatment In the event of overdose, betamethasone valerate should be withdrawn gradually by reducing the frequency of application, or by substituting a less potent corticosteroid because of the risk of glucocorticosteroid insufficiency.

Further management should be as clinically indicated or as recommended by the national poisons centre, where available. ATC code D07AC Corticosteroids, potent (group III) Mechanism of action Topical corticosteroids act as anti-inflammatory agents via multiple mechanisms to inhibit late phase allergic reactions including decreasing the density of mast cells, decreasing chemotaxis and activation of eosinophils, decreasing cytokine production by lymphocytes, monocytes, mast cells and eosinophils, and inhibiting the metabolism of arachidonic acid.

  • Pharmacodynamic effects Topical corticosteroids have anti-inflammatory, antipruritic, and vasoconstrictive properties.
  • Absorption Topical corticosteroids can be systemically absorbed from intact healthy skin.
  • The extent of percutaneous absorption of topical corticosteroids is determined by many factors, including the vehicle and the integrity of the epidermal barrier.

Occlusion, inflammation and/or other disease processes in the skin may also increase percutaneous absorption. Distribution The use of pharmacodynamic endpoints for assessing the systemic exposure of topical corticosteroids is necessary because circulating levels are well below the level of detection.

  1. Metabolism Once absorbed through the skin, topical corticosteroids are handled through pharmacokinetic pathways similar to systemically administered corticosteroids.
  2. They are metabolised, primarily in the liver.
  3. Elimination Topical corticosteroids are excreted by the kidneys.
  4. In addition, some corticosteroids and their metabolites are also excreted in the bile.

Reproductive toxicity Subcutaneous administration of betamethasone valerate to mice or rats at doses ≥0.1 mg/kg/day or rabbits at doses ≥12 micrograms/kg/day during pregnancy produced foetal abnormalities including cleft palate and intrauterine growth retardation.

Chlorocresol BP
Cetomacrogol 1000 BP
Cetostearyl Alcohol BP
White Soft Paraffin BP
Liquid Paraffin BP
Sodium Acid Phosphate BP
Phosphoric Acid BP
Sodium Hydroxide BP
Purified Water BP

None known.

Tubes 36 Months
500gm pots 18 months

Store below 25°C.15gm, 30gm and 100gm collapsible aluminium tubes internally coated with an epoxy resin based lacquer and closed with a cap.500mg opaque high density polythene pots with black urea formaldehyde screw caps having a steran faced wad. Not all pack sizes may be marketed No special requirements.

How many times can you use betnovate a day?

BETNOVATE should be used once or twice daily for no more than four weeks at a time. Only use BETNOVATE for as long as your doctor recommends. If the condition worsens or does not improve within two to four weeks, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Can I buy betnovate over the counter?

Betnovate Cream & Ointment FAQs –

Betnovate cream is a prescription-only medicine, therefore it cannot be bought over the counter at a pharmacy without the necessary prescription from a medical professional. It can be bought online from The Independent Pharmacy following an online consultation with one of our medical professionals. Yes – as long as you are buying from a website that is a legally operating and regulated pharmacy, it is perfectly safe to buy Betnovate online. The Independent Pharmacy is an NHS Online Pharmacy based in Bristol and has all the necessary regulation to be able to safely provide convenient access to genuine prescription remedies through our Online Pharmacy and Online Doctor. All of our eczema treatments are supplied by the same UK-based wholesalers used by the large high-street chains. This medication is for short-term use only. You shouldn’t need to use it for more than 2-3 weeks. If the symptoms are still present after this time, consult your doctor or pharmacist. It is not recommended to use Betnovate cream to treat acne. The active ingredients in this medication could potentially make skin conditions like this worse. Though Betnovate contains anti-bacterial properties, only use for skin irritations that have been cleared by a doctor or medical professional. Spots could be made worse with the use of this medication, so if you’re suffering from acne on your body, then this cream is not recommended. If you are looking for acne treatments, a full range and medicines advice can be found here. Betnovate and Dermovate are both topical steroids used for a number of different skin conditions. The main difference between the two is potency. Dermovate is five times more potent than Betnovate and so special care must be taken when using this medication. Betnovate should not be used directly on the skin of the face or the ears, as it’s a topical steroid. Only use on your face if you have been specifically directed to by your GP or a medical professional. If you have been advised to use this treatment on your face, then it’s important to avoid contact with the eyes. Because Betnovate is very potent, it is not recommended for young children or babies. There are other types of medication that will be suitable to treat eczema for this age group, so it’s suggested that you speak to a medical professional if you are concerned or seeking treatment for these symptoms in young children or babies. No, it is not recommended to use this medication on burns, scrapes or broken skin. If this treatment does come into contact with broken skin or burns, then wash with clean water immediately. If you have experienced severe burns, then it’s important to seek medical attention and get a treatment that is specifically suitable for this injury.

Can you put Moisturiser over betnovate?

Can I use Betnovate with other medicines? – Make sure your doctor or pharmacist know if you’re already using any other medicines, particularly if you’re already using any other corticosteroid medicines (including those bought without a prescription) before you start using Betnovate.

If you need to use other topical medicines on the same area of skin it’s recommended that you leave several minutes between applying each product. This is to allow each product time to be absorbed and avoid them mixing on the skin. If you also use a moisturiser it’s best to apply it about 30 minutes before applying Betnovate.

This will help soften the skin and improve the absorption of the corticosteroid. If you apply a moisturiser just before or after applying Betnovate this can dilute the corticosteroid and potentially make it less effective.

Does betnovate heal skin?

It belongs to a group of medicines called steroids. It helps to reduce swelling and irritation. Betnovate is used to help reduce the redness and itchiness of certain skin problems, such as eczema, psoriasis and dermatitis.

Can betnovate used in private parts?

Order Betnovate C Cream 30gm Online at discount rate

Betnovate-C cream is used to treat various conditions of skin conditions such as in dermatitis, psoriasis and eczema. It is also used in skin infections caused due to fungus or bacteria.

If you are allergic to betamethasone, clioquinol, or any other ingredients of this cream. If you have any other skin conditions other than for what it has been prescribed, as it could make them worse. It can worsen acne, herpes, chickenpox, or ringworm. It should not be used around the anu s or private parts. If you have or had an allergy to any creams or ointments.

Q: Can I apply Betnovate-C cream during pregnancy? A: There is limited information available about the safety of Betnovate-C cream during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, in case you have been prescribed this medicine, avoid using it on larger skin areas for a prolonged duration.

  1. Q: Can I apply Betnovate-C cream while breastfeeding? A: Betnovate-C cream should not be applied to the breast or areas near the breast of breastfeeding mothers as there can be chances of ingestion of this by the breastfed infant.
  2. Avoid using it on large areas of skin or for a prolonged period.
  3. Q: Can I drive if I have applied Betnovate-C cream? A: Betnovate-C cream is a topical preparation and may not affect the driving ability or ability to handle types of machinery.
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Q: Can I consume alcohol with Betnovate-C cream? A: There is limited information available on the interactions of Betnovate-C cream when taken with alcohol. However, consuming alcohol might delay the healing and clearance of infection.

Use Betnovate-C cream as directed by your doctor. For external use only. Apply it on a healthy skin surface free from cuts and wounds. A thin layer of cream should be applied. Gently rub this cream on the body surface. Apply the cream only in the affected area. Wash your hands before and after using this medicine, unless your hands are the area to be treated. Avoid touching the tip of the container directly to the infected area. In case your eyes come in contact with this medicine, rinse your eyes with clean water immediately.

Store Betnovate C cream at room temperature away from direct sunlight and moisture. Keep out of reach from children and pets.

A: Betnovate C cream does not help in reducing acne scars. Do not use this medicine for a condition other than what it is prescribed. A: Betnovate C cream does not have skin whitening action and does not help in improving complexation or inducing fairness.

A: Betnovate C cream helps in reducing itching and redness of skin associated with eczema and other skin infection. A: Consult your doctor before using this cream on the child. Do not use any medicine on a child without a paediatrician’s advice. A: Apply Betnovate-C cream in a clean area by gently rubbing and letting it firmly absorb into the skin.

Always wash your hands before and after applying for this medicine. A: Your face is an area where the skin is very delicate and thin. Therefore, you should always consult your doctor before using Betnovate C cream directly on your face. Moreover, it also contains a steroid which can cause thinning of the skin.

A: No, Betnovate-C cream should not be used for acne and pimples or any skin conditions for which the root cause is not clear. It can worsen acne. Betnovate-C cream should be used only if your doctor has prescribed it for you. A: No, Betnovate-C cream should not be used on burns or damaged skin. It should also not be used for burn marks.

A: Use Betnovate C cream for the duration as prescribed by your doctor. Prolonged use for more than 4 weeks is not recommended as it contains a steroid. This steroid can be absorbed into the skin over prolonged use and result in skin damage and hormonal issues.

A: Do not use any medicine after the expiry date on the label. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month. A: No, Betnovate C cream cannot be used for the treatment of dark spots. A: No, it is not recommended to use this cream for ringworm. This cream should be used only for the conditions that it is prescribed for.

Using the cream for any other conditions can lead to the worsening of the skin disease. Hence it is important to consult a doctor and avoid self-medication. A: Betnovate-C cream contains a combination of betamethasone and clioquinol, whereas Betnovate-GM cream contains a combination of gentamicin, betamethasone and miconazole.

  1. Both medicines are used for various skin conditions, such as eczema with bacterial or fungal infections.
  2. Based on the cause and your medical history, your doctor shall prescribe the suitable cream for you, do not self-medicate.
  3. A: Betnovate-C cream contains betamethasone and clioquinol, whereas Candid cream contains clotrimazole as its active medicine.

Both medicines are used for various skin diseases. Based on the cause and severity of the skin condition, your doctor shall prescribe a cream for you. Avoid self-medication. A: No, Betnovate C should not be used for dark circles. A: You should apply the Betnovate C in the exact amount and frequency as suggested by your doctor.

The doctor adjusts the dose on the basis of an underlying condition. Do not use more of it and more often of it. Use the Betnovate C for as long as your doctor recommends only. And if the symptoms do not improve or get worse even after applying it for 2-3 weeks, immediately talk to your doctor. A: Betnovate C is prescribed to treat the skin problem that you showed to your doctor.

Do not use it on private parts unless told by the doctor. It is usually meant for external application only and should be used exactly as advised by your doctor. A: Betnovate-C cream contains betamethasone and clioquinol. A: No, Betnovate C is not harmful to the skin if used in the exact way the doctor has prescribed you.

Also, do not use this medicine for any other skin condition other than what it is prescribed for. A: You can use Betnovate C on wounds after consulting a doctor only. The doctor will prescribe you the appropriate medicine after examining your skin condition. A: The composition of Betnovate C contains a combination of betamethasone and clioquinol as its active ingredient.

A: Yes, Betnovate C is effective in psoriasis. However, it should be used after consulting a doctor only A: No, pregnant women should not use Betnovate C cream unless told by the doctor. As there is limited information available about the safety of Betnovate-C cream during pregnancy.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant. In case you have been prescribed this medicine, avoid using it on larger skin areas for a prolonged duration. A: No, you should not stop using Betnovate C cream without consulting a doctor, as it may worsen the condition or cause a recurring infection. You must use it for the prescribed duration only.

Speak to your doctor if you do not feel any improvement even after a week. A: Betnovate C cream is used to reduce swelling, irritation, and itchiness in skin problems like eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis. This medicine is not recommended for use in treating boils and blisters.

What is the difference between betnovate and hydrocortisone?

Betamethasone is not the same as hydrocortisone, but both medications are corticosteroids (steroids, for short). They are often used to treat skin conditions, including contact dermatitis, psoriasis and eczema. Steroids like betamethasone and hydrocortisone work by relieving the inflammation that causes many of the symptoms associated with these skin conditions, such as itching, redness, dryness and/or scaling.

  1. The biggest difference between betamethasone and hydrocortisone is the strength.
  2. Certain strengths of hydrocortisone are available over-the-counter, but betamethasone requires a prescription.
  3. Betamethasone is generally recommended when other prescription drugs or over-the-counter topicals, including hydrocortisone cream, do not relieve symptoms effectively.

Some types of betamethasone are up to 600 times as potent as hydrocortisone. Both medications are available in various forms, including:

Ointments Creams Lotions Gels Sprays Foams

Which type is used depends on factors like the specific condition being treated and its location on the body. Betamethasone is typically applied to affected areas of skin once or twice a day, while hydrocortisone is usually applied one to four times a day. Side effects of topical betamethasone and hydrocortisone may include:

Burning Irritation Acne Unwanted hair growth Bruising Changes in skin color Small red bumps or rashes around the mouth Tiny white or red bumps on the skin

More serious side effects of both of these steroids may include:

Rash Skin infection where the medication was applied

You should carefully follow instructions on the label to minimize the chances of any side effects. Both medications are also available as a pill and/or shot. These forms of betamethasone may be used to treat severe allergic attacks, systemic inflammation and autoimmune conditions, including flares of rheumatoid arthritis or multiple sclerosis.

Which skin cream is best for fungal infection?

Clotrimazole : medicine used to treat fungal skin infections – NHS.

What is stronger than betnovate?

Dermatology – When parents fear the use of topical steroids Dermatology – When parents fear the use of topical steroids Topical steroids are a logical treatment option for exacerbations of atopic eczema but a lot can be done to reduce the need for them, writes Johnny Loughnane

Lichenified eczema in a five year old child
Flexural involvement of Seborrhoeic eczema

A five-year-old child presented with extensive atopic eczema, accompanied by her mother. The child was irritable, constantly scratching and getting very few good nights sleep.The eczema had been present since the child was three months old. The only significant relief obtained in the past was from topical steroid applications, usually combined with an oral antibiotic.

Reprieves were short-lived. The child was an infrequent visitor to the surgery apart from these crisis interventions in eczema management and for primary immunisations. The parents felt guilty that their child suffered so much and angry that medication had done so little to help. They held a strong belief that steroids were bad for the skin, especially a childs skin.

As a healthcare professional you feel that topical steroids have a great deal to offer this child. But you may not have much impact in this situation. Addressing concerns about steroids To proceed it is vital to explore the concerns behind the fear of steroids.

The most common concerns are that steroids thin your skin, make skin age faster or that they interfere with the immune system, leaving one susceptible to other diseases. To put the case for steroids, start by explaining that atopic eczema is an inflammatory disease mediated by the bodys immune system.

We now have more than 40 years of experience of steroid use, which are potent anti-inflammatory and immune modulating drugs. Inflammation of the skin leads to itch, in turn leading to scratching. This constant scratching leads to the visible evidence of eczema.

  • Steroids, therefore, represent a very logical treatment option for this condition.
  • Secondly, emphasise that all steroids are not of the same potency: clobetasone (Eumovate) is five times more potent than hydrocortisone and betamethasone (Betnovate) is five times more potent than clobetasone, and clobetasol (Dermovate) is more potent again.

Eczema in children can usually be managed using hydrocortisone and clobetasone. Side effects come into play when the basic steroid structure is altered to give potent and very potent applications, ie. betamethasone and clobetasol. Properly used hydrocortisone or clobetasone do not damage the skin, even when applied to a childs face.

For severe exacerbations clobetasone may need to be applied for a short period, before weaning down to hydrocortisone. Once the eczema is under control, regular committed emollient use should be continued indefinitely to help keep it so. However, encourage return to steroid use early in any exacerbation to ensure prompt control, before again returning to emollient use.

During steroid use encourage ongoing emollient application. This might be best applied at a different time to the steroid as concomitant use may alter steroid potency, rendering them less effective. Many things can be done to reduce steroid need for atopic eczema patients:

Beware staphylococcal infection (pustules, impetigo, oozing, pain) by releasing superantigens, bacteria exacerbate eczema. A 10 day course of flucloxacillin or erythromycin may bring remarkable improvement. Warn parents in advance that the improvement may not be prolonged and the possible need to repeat oral antibiotics on and offMaximise emollient use If the skin feels dry, not enough emollient is being applied. Six to eight applications a day may be needed. Moisturising baths should be advised and wet wrapping may be of great help in moisturising the skinReduce exposure to irritants (water, soap, shampoo, detergents and wool) and allergens (house dust and animal dander) that exacerbate eczemaIf eczema is dry, as most are, use steroid ointments (which moisturise) rather than creams (which tend to dry the skin)Avoid sharp changes in environmental temperature, eg. going from a warm room to undress in a cold bedroomIn the rare event of a food allergen being identified it should be avoided at all times. By 18 months, most children with atopic eczema have outgrown such a food allergyIf steroids are not controlling eczema, especially on the face and neck, try tacrolimus (Protopic) which is an immune modulator which does not have the side effect profile of topical steroids. It has a potency equal to potent topical steroids and can be particularly useful when managing facial eczema.

Johnny Loughnane is in general practice in Limerick : Dermatology – When parents fear the use of topical steroids

Is betnovate cream antiseptic?

Betnovate-N Cream is a combination medicine that is used to treat various types of skin infections. It minimizes symptoms of inflammation such as redness, swelling, and itching. It also has an antimicrobial action against the infection-causing microorganisms.

Can betnovate make skin worse?

Like all medicines, this medicine can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them. Stop using Betnovate and tell your doctor immediately if: you find that your skin condition gets worse, you develop a generalised rash or your skin becomes swollen during treatment.

Can betnovate be used in private parts?

Order Betnovate C Cream 30gm Online at discount rate

Betnovate-C cream is used to treat various conditions of skin conditions such as in dermatitis, psoriasis and eczema. It is also used in skin infections caused due to fungus or bacteria.

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If you are allergic to betamethasone, clioquinol, or any other ingredients of this cream. If you have any other skin conditions other than for what it has been prescribed, as it could make them worse. It can worsen acne, herpes, chickenpox, or ringworm. It should not be used around the anu s or private parts. If you have or had an allergy to any creams or ointments.

Q: Can I apply Betnovate-C cream during pregnancy? A: There is limited information available about the safety of Betnovate-C cream during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, in case you have been prescribed this medicine, avoid using it on larger skin areas for a prolonged duration.

Q: Can I apply Betnovate-C cream while breastfeeding? A: Betnovate-C cream should not be applied to the breast or areas near the breast of breastfeeding mothers as there can be chances of ingestion of this by the breastfed infant. Avoid using it on large areas of skin or for a prolonged period. Q: Can I drive if I have applied Betnovate-C cream? A: Betnovate-C cream is a topical preparation and may not affect the driving ability or ability to handle types of machinery.

Q: Can I consume alcohol with Betnovate-C cream? A: There is limited information available on the interactions of Betnovate-C cream when taken with alcohol. However, consuming alcohol might delay the healing and clearance of infection.

Use Betnovate-C cream as directed by your doctor. For external use only. Apply it on a healthy skin surface free from cuts and wounds. A thin layer of cream should be applied. Gently rub this cream on the body surface. Apply the cream only in the affected area. Wash your hands before and after using this medicine, unless your hands are the area to be treated. Avoid touching the tip of the container directly to the infected area. In case your eyes come in contact with this medicine, rinse your eyes with clean water immediately.

Store Betnovate C cream at room temperature away from direct sunlight and moisture. Keep out of reach from children and pets.

A: Betnovate C cream does not help in reducing acne scars. Do not use this medicine for a condition other than what it is prescribed. A: Betnovate C cream does not have skin whitening action and does not help in improving complexation or inducing fairness.

A: Betnovate C cream helps in reducing itching and redness of skin associated with eczema and other skin infection. A: Consult your doctor before using this cream on the child. Do not use any medicine on a child without a paediatrician’s advice. A: Apply Betnovate-C cream in a clean area by gently rubbing and letting it firmly absorb into the skin.

Always wash your hands before and after applying for this medicine. A: Your face is an area where the skin is very delicate and thin. Therefore, you should always consult your doctor before using Betnovate C cream directly on your face. Moreover, it also contains a steroid which can cause thinning of the skin.

  • A: No, Betnovate-C cream should not be used for acne and pimples or any skin conditions for which the root cause is not clear.
  • It can worsen acne.
  • Betnovate-C cream should be used only if your doctor has prescribed it for you.
  • A: No, Betnovate-C cream should not be used on burns or damaged skin.
  • It should also not be used for burn marks.

A: Use Betnovate C cream for the duration as prescribed by your doctor. Prolonged use for more than 4 weeks is not recommended as it contains a steroid. This steroid can be absorbed into the skin over prolonged use and result in skin damage and hormonal issues.

  1. A: Do not use any medicine after the expiry date on the label.
  2. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.
  3. A: No, Betnovate C cream cannot be used for the treatment of dark spots.
  4. A: No, it is not recommended to use this cream for ringworm.
  5. This cream should be used only for the conditions that it is prescribed for.

Using the cream for any other conditions can lead to the worsening of the skin disease. Hence it is important to consult a doctor and avoid self-medication. A: Betnovate-C cream contains a combination of betamethasone and clioquinol, whereas Betnovate-GM cream contains a combination of gentamicin, betamethasone and miconazole.

Both medicines are used for various skin conditions, such as eczema with bacterial or fungal infections. Based on the cause and your medical history, your doctor shall prescribe the suitable cream for you, do not self-medicate. A: Betnovate-C cream contains betamethasone and clioquinol, whereas Candid cream contains clotrimazole as its active medicine.

Both medicines are used for various skin diseases. Based on the cause and severity of the skin condition, your doctor shall prescribe a cream for you. Avoid self-medication. A: No, Betnovate C should not be used for dark circles. A: You should apply the Betnovate C in the exact amount and frequency as suggested by your doctor.

The doctor adjusts the dose on the basis of an underlying condition. Do not use more of it and more often of it. Use the Betnovate C for as long as your doctor recommends only. And if the symptoms do not improve or get worse even after applying it for 2-3 weeks, immediately talk to your doctor. A: Betnovate C is prescribed to treat the skin problem that you showed to your doctor.

Do not use it on private parts unless told by the doctor. It is usually meant for external application only and should be used exactly as advised by your doctor. A: Betnovate-C cream contains betamethasone and clioquinol. A: No, Betnovate C is not harmful to the skin if used in the exact way the doctor has prescribed you.

  1. Also, do not use this medicine for any other skin condition other than what it is prescribed for.
  2. A: You can use Betnovate C on wounds after consulting a doctor only.
  3. The doctor will prescribe you the appropriate medicine after examining your skin condition.
  4. A: The composition of Betnovate C contains a combination of betamethasone and clioquinol as its active ingredient.

A: Yes, Betnovate C is effective in psoriasis. However, it should be used after consulting a doctor only A: No, pregnant women should not use Betnovate C cream unless told by the doctor. As there is limited information available about the safety of Betnovate-C cream during pregnancy.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant. In case you have been prescribed this medicine, avoid using it on larger skin areas for a prolonged duration. A: No, you should not stop using Betnovate C cream without consulting a doctor, as it may worsen the condition or cause a recurring infection. You must use it for the prescribed duration only.

Speak to your doctor if you do not feel any improvement even after a week. A: Betnovate C cream is used to reduce swelling, irritation, and itchiness in skin problems like eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis. This medicine is not recommended for use in treating boils and blisters.

Where should you not apply steroid cream?

2. Key facts –

  • Most people need to use hydrocortisone treatments once or twice a day for 1 to 2 weeks. But if you buy it from a pharmacy or shop, do not use it for more than 1 week, talk to a doctor first.
  • Never put hydrocortisone on your face unless your doctor says it’s OK and has given you a prescription for it. It can make some skin problems worse like impetigo, rosacea and acne,
  • Only use hydrocortisone skin treatments on children under 10 years old if a doctor recommends it.
  • Creams you can buy are not supposed to be used on the eyes, around the bottom or genitals, or on broken or infected skin.
  • Hydrocortisone butyrate is stronger than other types of hydrocortisone for skin. It’s only available on prescription and is known by the brand name Locoid.

Can betnovate n be used on private parts?

Trade mark What you should know about Betnovate-N Cream

What your cream does

Betnovate-N Cream is a strong and rapidly effective treatment for inflamed skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis and dermatitis in which infection may be a problem. IT IS IMPORTANT TO READ THIS CAREFULLY BEFORE STARTING TREATMENT. Following this advice gives the cream a chance to work safely and effectively.

What is in your cream

Betnovate-N Cream is one of a group of medicines called topical steroids. “Topical” means they are put on the skin. Topical steroids reduce the redness and itchiness of certain skin problems. (They should not be confused with “anabolic” steroids misused by some body builders and taken as tablets or injections).

Betnovate-N Cream also contains neomycin which may help to prevent or clear up some bacterial infections of the skin. Ingredients of the cream include: The main active ingredient – betamethasone (as valerate) 0.1% an antibacterial agent – neomycin sulphate 3% a preservative – chlorocresol in a base containing cetomacrogol 1000, white soft paraffin, and liquid paraffin.

The cream does not contain any lanolin, parabens or colouring agents.

Before you use your cream

This cream has bean prescribed to treat the skin problem that you showed to your doctor. DO NOT put it on any other skin problems as it could make them worse, especially: acne some skin infections such as cold sores, herpes, impetigo, athletes foot, chicken pox, ringworm, thrush conditions called rosacea and perioral dermatitis.

DO NOT use it around the anus (back passage) or genitals (private parts) unless your doctor has told you to do so. If you have had an allergy to any creams or ointments in the past If you think you may be pregnant Did you tell your doctor at the last visit or an earlier visit? IF YOU DID NOT TELL YOUR DOCTOR THEN YOU SHOULD DO SO BEFORE STARTING THE TREATMENT Even so, your doctor may still want you to use the cream.

Face YOU SHOULD NOT normally use on the face where the skin thins easily – BUT if your doctor has advised you to use it on the face then, if possible. the course of treatment should not last more than five days. It is important that you DO NOT let the cream get in your eyes.

How to use your cream

If your doctor has told you in detail HOW MUCH to use and HOW OFTEN then keep to this advice. If you are not sure then follow the advice on the back of this leaflet. Unless told by your doctor: – YOU SHOULD NOT use more than this – YOU SHOULD NOT use on large areas of the body for a long time (such as nearly every day for many weeks or months).

Overuse like this may: – thin the skin so that it damages easily – allow the active ingredient to pass through the skin and affect other parts of the body, especially in infants and children, those who are pregnant, the elderly or those with kidney problems. If your skin problem does not improve in seven days tell your doctor.

If your doctor has prescribed the cream for psoriasis you should let your doctor review your progress at regular intervals, as such treatment needs careful supervision. continued

Has the cream any side effects?

Most people find using this cream causes no problems when used in the right amount for the correct length of time (See above as well as guidance on back of this leaflet). IF you find your condition gets worse during treatment you may be allergic to the cream or have a skin infection which needs other treatment.

Guidance on how much cream to use

If your doctor has told you in detail how to use the cream then keep to that advice otherwise:- Two or three times a day, after washing your hands, gently rub the correct amount of cream into the skin until it has all disappeared. For an adult: You should find that two fingertips of cream will treat both hands or one foot three fingertips of cream will treat one arm six fingertips of cream will treat one leg fourteen fingertips of cream will treat the front and back of one trunk Do not worry if you find you need a little more or a little less than this – it is only a rough guide.

Wash your hands before using the cream. Gently rub the correct amount into the skin until it has all disappeared. Unless used for treating the hands wash them again after using the cream. Anyone who helps to rub in the cream should also do the same or wear disposable plastic gloves. The bacteria that cause infections like the warm, moist conditions under bandages or dressings so always clean the skin before a fresh dressing is put on.

For a child: It should not be used in children under one year of age. The smaller the child the less you use. A child of 4 years needs about a third of the adult amount. A course of treatment for a child should not normally last more than five days unless your doctor has told you to use it for longer.

What is in your ointment

Betnovate-N Ointment is one of a group of medicines called topical steroids. “Topical” means they are put on the skin. Topical steroids reduce the redness and itchiness of certain skin problems. (They should not be confused with “anabolic” steroids misused by some body builders and taken as tablets or injections).