What To Do When Having A Heart Attack Alone?

What To Do When Having A Heart Attack Alone
What should you do if you are alone and have a heart attack? –

  1. Call 911 The most important thing to do when you suspect a heart attack is to call emergency medical services. Always call 911 before you attempt to contact anyone else. Calling 911 will almost always be the quickest way to get treatment. Even if you live in an area that an ambulance may have difficulty getting to, the emergency dispatcher can provide you with instructions on minimizing the damage.
  2. Consider contacting someone to come over immediately. If you have a trustworthy neighbor or relative who lives nearby, make another phone call asking that person to come to meet you. Having another person nearby can be helpful if you suddenly go into cardiac arrest. You should only do this if the emergency dispatcher permits you to get off the phone or if you have a second line you can call on while the dispatcher stays on the first line. Do not rely on another person to get you to the hospital. Wait for emergency paramedics to show up.
  3. Chew on aspirin. Chew and swallow a single 325-mg or two tablets of baby aspirin 81-mg. Chewing on aspirin is especially effective if done within 30 minutes of your first symptoms. Aspirin inhibits platelet development. Taking aspirin can delay the formation of blood clots that could further block your arteries during a heart attack. Chew the aspirin before swallowing it. By chewing the aspirin, you release more of the medicine directly into your stomach and hasten its ability to get into your bloodstream. Do NOT use this treatment If you are on a medication that interacts poorly with aspirin or have otherwise been told by your doctor not to take aspirin or if you are allergic to aspirin.
  4. Do not attempt to drive. Driving yourself to the hospital is not recommended. If you begin to experience heart attack symptoms while driving, immediately pull off to the side of the road. If you suffer from a cardiac arrest, you will pass out. This is the main reason why driving while suffering from a heart attack is not advised.
  5. Remain calm. As frightening as a heart attack is, rushing around or putting yourself into a state of panic can worsen the problem. Relax as much as possible to keep your heart rate steady and calm. Count as a way of slowing your heartbeat. Make sure that your counts are slow, using the standard one-one-thousand, two-one-thousand, three-one-thousand counting.
  6. Lie down. Lie on your back and raise your legs upward. This opens up the diaphragm, making it easier for you to breathe and supply oxygen to your blood. Make the position easier to maintain by propping your legs up on pillows or another object. You could also lie down on the floor with your legs propped up on a couch or chair. Make your way carefully if you cannot immediately lie down or sit, such as working on a ladder or crossing traffic. If you feel dizzy or unable to walk correctly, watching a fixed object such as the horizon or a large fixed object might help calm you and help you control the situation until help arrives.
  7. Take deep, steady breaths of fresh air. Even though your instinct might be to take rapid breaths when you experience a heart attack, the best way to maintain a constant supply of oxygen to your blood and your heart is to take slow, deep breaths. Consider lying down in front of an open window, open door, fan, or air conditioner. Providing yourself with a consistent stream of fresh air can help supply your heart with oxygen.
  8. Do not attempt Cough CPR. A common myth is that you can survive a heart attack alone by coughing in a particular manner. This probably won’t work, and worse still, attempting this technique may put you in more danger. Attempting this procedure on your own can cause you to accidentally work against the rhythm of your heart and make it harder to get oxygen into your blood rather than easier.
  9. Avoid food and drink. Eating and drinking are probably the last things on your mind when you experience a heart attack, but just in case, you should avoid food and drink even if you want them. Having anything other than aspirin in your system can make it more complicated for paramedics to give you adequate treatment. If necessary, you can swallow a little water to help you get the aspirin into your system, but even this should be avoided if possible.
  10. Follow-Up: Talk to your doctor about what to do in the future. Suffering a heart attack increases your risk of experiencing a heart attack in the future. When you survive your heart attack this time, you should talk with your physician to discuss improving your chances of survival if you should suffer from one again.

Your physician can prescribe medications for treating cardiac problems, including:

  • Nitroglycerin to help widen the blood vessels and lower pressure on the arteries
  • Beta-blockers to block the hormones responsible for triggering stress responses in the heart and surrounding cardiac tissue.
  • Blood thinners to lessen chances of blood clots and anti-stickiness meds for platelets, both of which help prevent future heart attacks due to blockage of the arteries in the heart.

You should get treatment for your heart attack within the first hour of your initial symptoms. If you wait longer than that, your heart will have more difficulty repairing the damage/cell death in the muscles of the heart. The ultimate goal is to have the constricted artery back open within 90 minutes to minimize damage as much as possible.

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What is the best thing to do during a heart attack?

What to do if you or someone else may be having a heart attack –

  • Call 911 or your local emergency number. Don’t ignore the symptoms of a heart attack. If you can’t get an ambulance or emergency vehicle to come to you, have a neighbor or a friend drive you to the nearest hospital. Drive yourself only if you have no other option. Because your condition can worsen, driving yourself puts you and others at risk.
  • Chew and swallow an aspirin while waiting for emergency help. Aspirin helps keep your blood from clotting. When taken during a heart attack, it could reduce heart damage. Don’t take aspirin if you are allergic to it or have been told by your health care provider never to take aspirin.
  • Take nitroglycerin, if prescribed. If you think you’re having a heart attack and your health care provider has previously prescribed nitroglycerin for you, take it as directed while waiting for emergency medical help.
  • Begin CPR if the person is unconscious. If the person isn’t breathing or you don’t find a pulse, begin CPR to keep blood flowing after you call for emergency medical help. Push hard and fast on the center of the person’s chest in a fairly rapid rhythm — about 100 to 120 compressions a minute.
  • If an automated external defibrillator (AED) is immediately available and the person is unconscious, follow the device instructions for using it.

What should you not do when someone is having a heart attack?

Step 3: Stay calm – As you’re waiting for emergency care, try to remain calm, loosen any clothing and rest. If you suspect you’re having a heart attack, don’t eat or drink anything outside of medication, and if someone else is having a heart attack, don’t allow them to do so either.

Can a heart attack stop on its own?

– Heart attack symptoms typically persist for longer than a few minutes. They may go away and come back again, or they may occur intermittently over several hours, In most cases, the symptoms will begin slowly and cause mild pain or discomfort. Sometimes, however, the symptoms can be sudden and intense.

Can drinking water prevent a heart attack?

You are here – News Release Tuesday, March 29, 2022 Serum sodium levels may help identify adults with a greater chance of experiencing heart disease. Staying well-hydrated may be associated with a reduced risk for developing heart failure, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

  • Their findings, which appear in the European Heart Journal, suggest that consuming sufficient amounts of fluids throughout life not only supports essential body functioning, but may also reduce the risk of severe heart problems in the future.
  • Heart failure, a chronic condition that develops when the heart does not pump enough blood for the body’s needs, affects more than 6.2 million Americans, a little more than 2% of the population.

It is also more common among adults ages 65 and older. “Similar to reducing salt intake, drinking enough water and staying hydrated are ways to support our hearts and may help reduce long-term risks for heart disease,” said Natalia Dmitrieva, Ph.D., the lead study author and a researcher in the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of NIH.

  • After conducting preclinical research that suggested connections between dehydration and cardiac fibrosis, a hardening of the heart muscles, Dmitrieva and researchers looked for similar associations in large-scale population studies.
  • To start, they analyzed data from more than 15,000 adults, ages 45-66, who enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities ( ARIC) study between 1987-89 and shared information from medical visits over a 25-year period.

In selecting participants for their retrospective review, the scientists focused on those whose hydration levels were within a normal range and who did not have diabetes, obesity, or heart failure at the start of the study. Approximately 11,814 adults were included in the final analysis, and of those, the researchers found, 1,366 (11.56%) later developed heart failure.

To assess potential links with hydration, the team assessed the hydration status of the participants using several clinical measures. Looking at levels of serum sodium, which increases as the body’s fluid levels decrease, was especially useful in helping to identify participants with an increased risk for developing heart failure.

It also helped identify older adults with an increased risk for developing both heart failure and left ventricular hypertrophy, an enlargement and thickening of the heart. For example, adults with serum sodium levels starting at 143 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L) – a normal range is 135-146 mEq/L – in midlife had a 39% associated increased risk for developing heart failure compared to adults with lower levels.

  • And for every 1 mEq/L increase in serum sodium within the normal range of 135-146 mEq/L, the likelihood of a participant developing heart failure increased by 5%.
  • In a cohort of about 5,000 adults ages 70-90, those with serum sodium levels of 142.5-143 mEq/L at middle age were 62% more likely to develop left ventricular hypertrophy.

Serum sodium levels starting at 143 mEq/L correlated with a 102% increased risk for left ventricular hypertrophy and a 54% increased risk for heart failure. Based on these data, the authors conclude serum sodium levels above 142 mEq/L in middle age are associated with increased risks for developing left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure later in life.

A randomized, controlled trial will be necessary to confirm these preliminary findings, the researchers said. However, these early associations suggest good hydration may help prevent or slow the progression of changes within the heart that can lead to heart failure. “Serum sodium and fluid intake can easily be assessed in clinical exams and help doctors identify patients who may benefit from learning about ways to stay hydrated,” said Manfred Boehm, M.D., who leads the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine,

Fluids are essential for a range of bodily functions, including helping the heart pump blood efficiently, supporting blood vessel function, and in orchestrating circulation. Yet many people take in far less than they need, the researchers said. While fluid guidelines vary based on the body’s needs, the researchers recommended a daily fluid intake of 6-8 cups (1.5-2.1 liters) for women and 8-12 cups (2-3 liters) for men.

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also provides tips to support healthy hydration,
  • This research was supported by the Division of Intramural Research at NHLBI.
  • Other coauthors include Delong Liu, Ph.D., from the Laboratory of Vascular and Matrix Genetics and Colin O.
  • Wu, Ph.D., from the Office of Biostatistics Research,
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The ARIC study has been supported by research contracts from NHLBI, NIH, and the Department of Health and Human Services. About the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI): NHLBI is the global leader in conducting and supporting research in heart, lung, and blood diseases and sleep disorders that advances scientific knowledge, improves public health, and saves lives.

  • For more information, visit https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov,
  • About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S.
  • Department of Health and Human Services.
  • NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases.

For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov, NIHTurning Discovery Into Health ® ###

Can ibuprofen stop a heart attack?

Signs of a heart attack – Chest pain or discomfort is the most common symptom of a heart attack in both men and women. However:

  • The symptoms may not always be sudden or severe.
  • Some people do not experience any chest pain.
  • Some people only have mild chest pain or discomfort.
  • Some people only experience one symptom.
  • Other people may have a combination of symptoms.

If you experience any of these signs of a heart attack:

  1. CALL 9-1-1 or your local emergency number immediately.
  2. Stop all activity. Sit or lie down, in whatever position is most comfortable.
  3. Take your nitroglycerin. If you take nitroglycerin, take your normal dosage.
  4. Chew and swallow ASA (Aspirin), if you are not allergic or intolerant – either one 325 mg tablet or two 81 mg tablets.
  5. • ASA can help by stopping the blood clot that is causing the heart attack from getting any bigger. • Do not take other pain medications such as Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Advil (ibuprofen) instead of ASA. • Do not substitute ASA for medical care. Call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number first.

  6. Rest and wait. Stay calm while waiting for help to arrive.
  7. Keep a list of your medications in your wallet and by the phone. Emergency personnel will want this information.

What does a minor heart attack feel like?

Chest Pain, Pressure, Fullness, or Discomfort Most heart attacks actually involve only mild pain or discomfort in the center of your chest. You may also feel pressure, squeezing, or fullness. These symptoms usually start slowly, and they may go away and come back.

What is the best position for someone having a heart attack?

Call 999 or 112 for emergency help straight away and tell them you think someone is having a heart attack. Help move the casualty into a comfortable position. The best position is on the floor, with their knees bent and their head and shoulders supported. You could place cushions behind them or under their knees.

What time do most heart attacks happen?

What time of day is a heart attack most likely to happen? ‘Most heart attacks hit during the early morning hours from 4 – 10 am when blood platelets are stickier, and there is increased adrenaline released from the adrenal glands that can trigger rupture of plaques in coronary arteries,’ said Dr. Goodroe.

How should you sleep to avoid a heart attack?

Which Side: Right or Left? – Both sides are not equal when it comes to side sleeping, mainly because your body is not symmetrical. We recommend sleeping on the right side since it may be the key to a healthier heart. Studies suggest it reduces pressure on the heart and stabilizes your blood pressure and heart rate.

  • Does that mean sleeping on your left side is bad for your heart? Not necessarily, as the previously mentioned 2003 study shows.
  • Remember that the study examined both subjects with congestive heart failure and perfectly healthy subjects.
  • The control subjects with healthy hearts freely slept on their left and right sides.

It’s just that right-side sleeping helps your heart perform better, which is excellent for anyone with a heart condition. Pregnancy is an exception to the “right side is better” rule, as blood flow from the mother to the fetus improves when the mother sleeps on her left side.

Can you feel a heart attack before it happens?

Symptoms – Symptoms of a heart attack vary. Some people have mild symptoms. Others have severe symptoms. Some people have no symptoms. Common heart attack symptoms include:

Chest pain that may feel like pressure, tightness, pain, squeezing or aching Pain or discomfort that spreads to the shoulder, arm, back, neck, jaw, teeth or sometimes the upper belly Cold sweat Fatigue Heartburn or indigestion Lightheadedness or sudden dizziness Nausea Shortness of breath

Women may have atypical symptoms such as brief or sharp pain felt in the neck, arm or back. Sometimes, the first symptom sign of a heart attack is sudden cardiac arrest. Some heart attacks strike suddenly. But many people have warning signs and symptoms hours, days or weeks in advance.

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What is the best position for someone having a heart attack?

Call 999 or 112 for emergency help straight away and tell them you think someone is having a heart attack. Help move the casualty into a comfortable position. The best position is on the floor, with their knees bent and their head and shoulders supported. You could place cushions behind them or under their knees.

Can drinking water prevent a heart attack?

You are here – News Release Tuesday, March 29, 2022 Serum sodium levels may help identify adults with a greater chance of experiencing heart disease. Staying well-hydrated may be associated with a reduced risk for developing heart failure, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

Their findings, which appear in the European Heart Journal, suggest that consuming sufficient amounts of fluids throughout life not only supports essential body functioning, but may also reduce the risk of severe heart problems in the future. Heart failure, a chronic condition that develops when the heart does not pump enough blood for the body’s needs, affects more than 6.2 million Americans, a little more than 2% of the population.

It is also more common among adults ages 65 and older. “Similar to reducing salt intake, drinking enough water and staying hydrated are ways to support our hearts and may help reduce long-term risks for heart disease,” said Natalia Dmitrieva, Ph.D., the lead study author and a researcher in the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of NIH.

  1. After conducting preclinical research that suggested connections between dehydration and cardiac fibrosis, a hardening of the heart muscles, Dmitrieva and researchers looked for similar associations in large-scale population studies.
  2. To start, they analyzed data from more than 15,000 adults, ages 45-66, who enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities ( ARIC) study between 1987-89 and shared information from medical visits over a 25-year period.

In selecting participants for their retrospective review, the scientists focused on those whose hydration levels were within a normal range and who did not have diabetes, obesity, or heart failure at the start of the study. Approximately 11,814 adults were included in the final analysis, and of those, the researchers found, 1,366 (11.56%) later developed heart failure.

  1. To assess potential links with hydration, the team assessed the hydration status of the participants using several clinical measures.
  2. Looking at levels of serum sodium, which increases as the body’s fluid levels decrease, was especially useful in helping to identify participants with an increased risk for developing heart failure.

It also helped identify older adults with an increased risk for developing both heart failure and left ventricular hypertrophy, an enlargement and thickening of the heart. For example, adults with serum sodium levels starting at 143 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L) – a normal range is 135-146 mEq/L – in midlife had a 39% associated increased risk for developing heart failure compared to adults with lower levels.

And for every 1 mEq/L increase in serum sodium within the normal range of 135-146 mEq/L, the likelihood of a participant developing heart failure increased by 5%. In a cohort of about 5,000 adults ages 70-90, those with serum sodium levels of 142.5-143 mEq/L at middle age were 62% more likely to develop left ventricular hypertrophy.

Serum sodium levels starting at 143 mEq/L correlated with a 102% increased risk for left ventricular hypertrophy and a 54% increased risk for heart failure. Based on these data, the authors conclude serum sodium levels above 142 mEq/L in middle age are associated with increased risks for developing left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure later in life.

  • A randomized, controlled trial will be necessary to confirm these preliminary findings, the researchers said.
  • However, these early associations suggest good hydration may help prevent or slow the progression of changes within the heart that can lead to heart failure.
  • Serum sodium and fluid intake can easily be assessed in clinical exams and help doctors identify patients who may benefit from learning about ways to stay hydrated,” said Manfred Boehm, M.D., who leads the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine,

Fluids are essential for a range of bodily functions, including helping the heart pump blood efficiently, supporting blood vessel function, and in orchestrating circulation. Yet many people take in far less than they need, the researchers said. While fluid guidelines vary based on the body’s needs, the researchers recommended a daily fluid intake of 6-8 cups (1.5-2.1 liters) for women and 8-12 cups (2-3 liters) for men.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also provides tips to support healthy hydration, This research was supported by the Division of Intramural Research at NHLBI. Other coauthors include Delong Liu, Ph.D., from the Laboratory of Vascular and Matrix Genetics and Colin O. Wu, Ph.D., from the Office of Biostatistics Research,

The ARIC study has been supported by research contracts from NHLBI, NIH, and the Department of Health and Human Services. About the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI): NHLBI is the global leader in conducting and supporting research in heart, lung, and blood diseases and sleep disorders that advances scientific knowledge, improves public health, and saves lives.

For more information, visit https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov, About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases.

For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov, NIHTurning Discovery Into Health ® ###