Which Doctor To Consult For Breast Pain?

Which Doctor To Consult For Breast Pain
When to See a Healthcare Provider – It’s important to see a healthcare provider—either your primary care physician or your gynecologist—for any new breast or nipple pain. While most cases of breast pain are mild and easily managed, you do not want to delay a diagnosis of breast cancer or a serious non-breast related cause, like a heart condition.

What kind of Doctor do you see for breast cancer?

The majority of breast lumps are noncancerous, which means they are not cancerous. You may be shocked to discover a breast lump, but it’s essential to realize that it may not have any long-term consequences for your health. A breast lump, on the other hand, can be a symptom of malignancy.

  • It’s usually a good idea to get any lumps or swelling on your breasts checked out by a Breast Surgeon Although breasts are typically associated with women, both men and women have breast tissue.
  • Your hormones influence this tissue.
  • Hormonal changes can cause lumps to develop and, in some circumstances, to dissolve spontaneously.

Breast lumps can appear at any age. Some newborns acquire breast lumps as a result of the estrogen their mothers give them at birth. These usually disappear when the estrogen exits their systems. Breast lumps that are painful in prepubescent females are common.

These generally disappear on their own throughout adolescence. During puberty, adolescent guys might get breast lumps as well. These are also transient and vanish typically within a few months. What factors cause breast lump – Depending on the function, the breast tissue composition might change. They will feel and seem differently.

The breast contains fibrous connective tissue, fatty tissue, nerves, blood arteries, and lymph nodes. Each region of the breast might react differently to changes in body chemistry. These changes affect the vibrations and texture of the breasts, which might influence the development of lumps in the breasts.

Breast cysts are soft, fluid-filled sacs that can be found in the breast. Milk cysts are milk-filled sacs that can form during nursing. Fibrocystic breasts are a condition in which the breast tissue contains a large number of cysts. Noncancerous rubbery lumps that move freely inside the breast tissue and seldom turn malignant are known as fibroadenoma. hamartoma, a tumor-like development that is benign Intraductal papilloma indicates a small, noncancerous growth in the milk duct. Lipoma is a noncancerous, slow-growing fatty mass. Mastitis (inflammation of the breasts) or a breast infection injury Breast cancer

Who to consult for Breast Lump – The patient needs to call a breast lump doctor within a week or two, whether you think the lump is malignant or not. Because not all women have the same symptoms of breast cancer, it’s crucial to see a primary care physician or gynecologist, who will do a physical exam to assess the lump or tumor in the breast.

The doctor may suggest a mammogram or an ultrasound during the clinical breast exam. An imaging test will indicate if the breast lump is solid or fluid-filled and whether it has benign or potentially cancerous features. A breast lump doctor may recommend a biopsy of the region or send you to a breast specialist based on the results.

What to expect during an Appointment for a Breast surgeon? Consult your doctor if you notice a lump or anything odd in your breast. Here’s what to expect at your initial consultation with a gynecologist or doctor for breast lump:

Health history – Your Doctor will inquire about your symptoms, medical history, and family background. Breast exam (mammogram and/ or ultrasound) – These imaging scans give you a close-up look at your breast. Discussion about other tests you might need – Your Doctor may want to look into the bump more.

Tests required to detect breast lump – Depending on the results of your initial checkup, a breast surgeon may perform or recommend further testing, such as:

Breast MRI – Magnetic fields are used in this imaging scan to produce precise breast pictures. Needle aspiration – The Doctor extracts a sample of cells for analysis using a needle. Biopsy – This method extracts a bigger tissue sample for examination. Biopsy techniques are classified into various kinds. Radiologists use a bigger needle to extract a tissue sample during a core biopsy. Breast Surgeons remove the whole breast lump during an excisional biopsy.

Treatments available for breast lump – The treatment for a breast lump is determined by the etiology. Some lumps might not necessitate treatment. A gynecologist or breast surgeon may perform the following treatment in order to treat breast lump:

Antibiotics are prescribed for a breast infection. Breast cyst fluid drainage (if it is large or painful) An excisional biopsy removes a mass from breast lumps (if suspicious for cancer, painful or enlarging). Breast cancer treatment if the lump is biopsy-proven. Lumpectomy, mastectomy, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are all possible cancer treatments.

Where to get help – Credihealth assists you in scheduling an appointment with the best Breast surgeon in India. Credihealth allows you to find the best hospital or doctor by knowing essential details such as admission fee, OPD hours, facility, specialization, expertise, cost comparison, and ratings & reviews.

The healthcare portal is a one-stop-shop for all of your healthcare-related needs, such as scheduling an appointment with a hospital or doctor, ordering online medicine, scheduling a lab test, or requesting home attendant services. Credihealth makes everything available in a single click, including teleconsultations, expert advice, and second opinions, as well as treatment costs, to make your life easier.

Breast pain | Dr. Indu Bansal Aggarwal

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When should you see a doctor for breast pain?

Breast discomfort is quite prevalent in women, with over 70% of women suffering breast pain at some point in their life. Breast discomfort might feel like cramps, dull ache, aching, acute sensations, or even a bruise. Its effect varies, making fundamental behaviors such as dressing, walking, and simple acts of intimacy extremely painful in certain circumstances.

If you are causing severe breast pain frequently, you must consult a breast pain doctor immediately. Many women feel breast discomfort as a regular part of their menstrual cycle (periods). This is known as cyclical breast discomfort. Non-cyclical breast discomfort refers to persistent pain in the breast that is not caused by menstruation.

Pain that seems like it’s coming from the breast might sometimes be caused by something else, such as a torn muscle in the chest. This is referred to as chest wall discomfort. A comprehensive assessment consists of a clinical breast exam and imaging investigations such as mammography and ultrasound.

  • If a mammogram or ultrasound reveals nothing, an MRI may be required.
  • In the absence of evidence on a clinical exam or diagnostic imaging, breast discomfort is frequently linked with benign causes.
  • Tests Performed for breast pain – A breast pain doctor may perform a series of tests to detect any abnormality in your breast.

Also, he /she may discuss your health history and more symptoms you are experiencing. below are the diagnosis test a doctor may perform –

Breast exam – Your doctor will examine both of your breasts as well as the lymph nodes in your armpit, feeling for any lumps or other irregularities that can indicate breast cancer. Mammogram – This is a type of X-ray of the breast. Breast cancer screening using mammograms is a frequent practice. If an abnormality is discovered on screening mammography, your doctor may advise you to get a diagnostic mammogram to further investigate the anomaly. Breast Ultrasound – Ultrasound imaging creates pictures of structures deep within the body by using sound waves. A new breast lump can be ultrasounded to establish whether it is a solid mass or a fluid-filled cyst. Biopsy – The only sure way to diagnose breast cancer is through a biopsy. During a biopsy, your doctor will take a tissue core from the questionable location using a specialized needle instrument guided by X-ray or another imaging test. A tiny metal marker is often left at the spot within your breast to help future imaging examinations identify the region. Biopsy samples are submitted to a lab for testing to see if the cells are malignant. A biopsy sample is also tested for hormone receptors and other receptors that may impact treatment options. MRI – An MRI machine creates images of the inside of your breast using a magnet and radio waves. You will be given a dye injection before your breast MRI. An MRI, unlike other types of imaging procedures, does not employ radiation to produce pictures.

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The doctor should consult for breast pain – A gynecologist or family practice doctor will often find a breast anomaly during a regular check-up or mammography before a woman detects it on her own. When women observe changes in the way their breasts feel or appear, they may be unsure of the illnesses that different medical specialists can identify.

  1. Internal/Family Medicine Doctor – An internal medicine doctor, often known as a family practice doctor, treats patients for a variety of ailments ranging from the common cold to back pain.
  2. They seldom perform gynecological examinations.
  3. Instead, for pelvic examinations or other female-specific health problems, they send patients to a gynecologist.

On the other hand, some family medicine practitioners will perform a breast exam as part of their entire annual health check. If an internal medicine doctor finds a lump or receives abnormal mammography findings, he or she will send the patient to a breast care expert.

  • Gynecologist – A gynecologist is a doctor who focuses on women’s health.
  • Many women, particularly those who are young and in good health, only see a gynecologist.
  • Young women are often seen by their doctor only once a year for an annual gynecological check-up.
  • They will undergo a pap smear, a breast exam, and mammography at that time if they are old enough.

If regular mammography reveals an abnormality, the gynecologist will alert the patient and recommend her to a breast care expert. Medical Oncologist – If a patient is diagnosed with cancer, she may be sent to a medical oncologist by a breast care expert.

  • The oncologist will assess whether chemotherapy is a good option for the patient.
  • The medical oncologist will also decide if the patient may benefit from endocrine treatment to treat malignancies caused by hormones.
  • Radiation Oncologist – Radiation oncologists are radiation oncologists that specialize in radiation treatment.

A breast care expert may recommend patients to a radiation specialist if they believe it would be beneficial as part of a comprehensive treatment plan. Breast Care Specialist – When anything changes in a patient’s breast, all roads often lead to a breast care specialist.

  • When an internist or gynecologist notices something unusual in a patient’s breast, they send the patient to a breast specialist for a diagnosis.
  • In the majority of situations, the patient has previously undergone mammography.
  • The breast care expert will perform further tests to evaluate if the patient’s lump or other symptoms indicate benign breast illness or breast cancer.

A breast care expert would often do an ultrasound and, if necessary, ultrasound-guided biopsy to identify the abnormalities. Patients may also opt to get genetic testing to learn about their cancer risk. If the doctor thinks that removing breast tissue is necessary, he or she will proceed with the procedure.

  1. If the tissue is malignant, the breast specialist will decide whether the patient might benefit from a referral to a medical oncologist and a radiation oncologist.
  2. How to get help for breast pain – Credihealth helps you find the top breast pain doctor in a single click, where you can view their consultation fees, OPD & IPD hours, expertise, services provided, ratings & reviews, and so on.

For a second opinion or teleconsultations, you can arrange an online appointment or send a callback request to Credihealth at 8010-994-994. Aside from that, you may use Credihealth to identify the top clinics and hospitals in your region, schedule a lab test appointment, buy online medicine, apply for a medical loan, and request a home attendant.

What kind of doctor should I See for a lump?

Breast discomfort is quite prevalent in women, with over 70% of women suffering breast pain at some point in their life. Breast discomfort might feel like cramps, dull ache, aching, acute sensations, or even a bruise. Its effect varies, making fundamental behaviors such as dressing, walking, and simple acts of intimacy extremely painful in certain circumstances.

  • If you are causing severe breast pain frequently, you must consult a breast pain doctor immediately.
  • Many women feel breast discomfort as a regular part of their menstrual cycle (periods).
  • This is known as cyclical breast discomfort.
  • Non-cyclical breast discomfort refers to persistent pain in the breast that is not caused by menstruation.

Pain that seems like it’s coming from the breast might sometimes be caused by something else, such as a torn muscle in the chest. This is referred to as chest wall discomfort. A comprehensive assessment consists of a clinical breast exam and imaging investigations such as mammography and ultrasound.

  • If a mammogram or ultrasound reveals nothing, an MRI may be required.
  • In the absence of evidence on a clinical exam or diagnostic imaging, breast discomfort is frequently linked with benign causes.
  • Tests Performed for breast pain – A breast pain doctor may perform a series of tests to detect any abnormality in your breast.

Also, he /she may discuss your health history and more symptoms you are experiencing. below are the diagnosis test a doctor may perform –

Breast exam – Your doctor will examine both of your breasts as well as the lymph nodes in your armpit, feeling for any lumps or other irregularities that can indicate breast cancer. Mammogram – This is a type of X-ray of the breast. Breast cancer screening using mammograms is a frequent practice. If an abnormality is discovered on screening mammography, your doctor may advise you to get a diagnostic mammogram to further investigate the anomaly. Breast Ultrasound – Ultrasound imaging creates pictures of structures deep within the body by using sound waves. A new breast lump can be ultrasounded to establish whether it is a solid mass or a fluid-filled cyst. Biopsy – The only sure way to diagnose breast cancer is through a biopsy. During a biopsy, your doctor will take a tissue core from the questionable location using a specialized needle instrument guided by X-ray or another imaging test. A tiny metal marker is often left at the spot within your breast to help future imaging examinations identify the region. Biopsy samples are submitted to a lab for testing to see if the cells are malignant. A biopsy sample is also tested for hormone receptors and other receptors that may impact treatment options. MRI – An MRI machine creates images of the inside of your breast using a magnet and radio waves. You will be given a dye injection before your breast MRI. An MRI, unlike other types of imaging procedures, does not employ radiation to produce pictures.

The doctor should consult for breast pain – A gynecologist or family practice doctor will often find a breast anomaly during a regular check-up or mammography before a woman detects it on her own. When women observe changes in the way their breasts feel or appear, they may be unsure of the illnesses that different medical specialists can identify.

Internal/Family Medicine Doctor – An internal medicine doctor, often known as a family practice doctor, treats patients for a variety of ailments ranging from the common cold to back pain. They seldom perform gynecological examinations. Instead, for pelvic examinations or other female-specific health problems, they send patients to a gynecologist.

On the other hand, some family medicine practitioners will perform a breast exam as part of their entire annual health check. If an internal medicine doctor finds a lump or receives abnormal mammography findings, he or she will send the patient to a breast care expert.

  • Gynecologist – A gynecologist is a doctor who focuses on women’s health.
  • Many women, particularly those who are young and in good health, only see a gynecologist.
  • Young women are often seen by their doctor only once a year for an annual gynecological check-up.
  • They will undergo a pap smear, a breast exam, and mammography at that time if they are old enough.
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If regular mammography reveals an abnormality, the gynecologist will alert the patient and recommend her to a breast care expert. Medical Oncologist – If a patient is diagnosed with cancer, she may be sent to a medical oncologist by a breast care expert.

  1. The oncologist will assess whether chemotherapy is a good option for the patient.
  2. The medical oncologist will also decide if the patient may benefit from endocrine treatment to treat malignancies caused by hormones.
  3. Radiation Oncologist – Radiation oncologists are radiation oncologists that specialize in radiation treatment.

A breast care expert may recommend patients to a radiation specialist if they believe it would be beneficial as part of a comprehensive treatment plan. Breast Care Specialist – When anything changes in a patient’s breast, all roads often lead to a breast care specialist.

When an internist or gynecologist notices something unusual in a patient’s breast, they send the patient to a breast specialist for a diagnosis. In the majority of situations, the patient has previously undergone mammography. The breast care expert will perform further tests to evaluate if the patient’s lump or other symptoms indicate benign breast illness or breast cancer.

A breast care expert would often do an ultrasound and, if necessary, ultrasound-guided biopsy to identify the abnormalities. Patients may also opt to get genetic testing to learn about their cancer risk. If the doctor thinks that removing breast tissue is necessary, he or she will proceed with the procedure.

  • If the tissue is malignant, the breast specialist will decide whether the patient might benefit from a referral to a medical oncologist and a radiation oncologist.
  • How to get help for breast pain – Credihealth helps you find the top breast pain doctor in a single click, where you can view their consultation fees, OPD & IPD hours, expertise, services provided, ratings & reviews, and so on.

For a second opinion or teleconsultations, you can arrange an online appointment or send a callback request to Credihealth at 8010-994-994. Aside from that, you may use Credihealth to identify the top clinics and hospitals in your region, schedule a lab test appointment, buy online medicine, apply for a medical loan, and request a home attendant.

Should you worry about sore boobs?

Breasts don’t get enough credit for all the cool advantages they can offer. Pretty bras! Delicious sex feelings! Breast pain ! Oh, wait. Not that last one. Breast pain is actually pretty terrible, and depending on how unexpected it is, you may also find it concerning.

The good news is that breast pain usually isn’t anything to worry about, and there are often ways to ease your aches so you can enjoy your breasts (or, at least, forget they’re there). First of all, you should know that breast pain is really common. “The majority of women will have some breast pain at some point in their lives,” Therese Bartholomew Bevers, M.D., F.A.A.F.P., a professor of clinical cancer prevention and medical director of the Cancer Prevention Center and prevention outreach programs at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, tells SELF.

Indeed, the Mayo Clinic describes breast pain, also known as mastalgia, as “a common complaint among women.” Breast pain can present in many different ways, Dennis Holmes, M.D., breast cancer surgeon and researcher, and interim director of the Margie Petersen Breast Center at John Wayne Cancer Institute at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif., tells SELF.

Sometimes it may be a dull ache that always precedes your period, Other times, it can be soreness so uncomfortable you want to ice down your boobs. The manifestation really depends on the cause. If you get breast pain around your period every month, this is probably cyclic breast pain. This basically just means that it’s tied to your menstrual cycle.

In the first two weeks of your cycle, your levels of estrogen increase to prompt ovulation, then your progesterone levels rise in the second half of your cycle, Katherine T. Johnston M.D., a primary care physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, tells SELF.

  1. Together, these hormonal changes can make your breasts feel swollen and heavy with a dull ache.
  2. These hormonal fluctuations can also contribute to fibrocystic breast changes (aka having benign lumps in your breasts), which can make your chest feel pretty sore, too.
  3. Since this kind of pain happens due to your menstrual cycle, it’s most common in women who haven’t yet hit menopause,

This kind of breast pain should be manageable with anti-inflammatory pain medication or hormonal contraception, which can reduce some of the hormonal shifts that can lead to soreness. On the other hand, some people find that hormonal birth control can contribute to breast pain because of the increased estrogen.

  • If you suspect that’s what’s up, talk with your doctor about whether other contraceptive options may be better for you.
  • If your boobs hurt and you’re not about to get your period, it could be one of any number of things.
  • Lots of random factors can cause noncyclic breast pain, aka the kind that’s not related to your menstrual cycle.

One of the following could be to blame:

You’re pregnant, The same hormones that can cause sore breasts before your period can also lead to achy pregnancy boobs,You’ve gained weight —the extra body mass can pull on tiny nerve fibers in your breasts, causing pain and discomfort, Dr. Johnson explains.Your chest muscles are sore or injured (possibly from a serious workout).Your bra isn’t doing its job. Wearing a bra that doesn’t fit properly can make your breasts feel worse because of inadequate support. This is especially true if your sports bra doesn’t fit well and you’re doing a lot of high-impact activities. Here’s how to find a bra that actually fits,

So, when should you actually make a doctor’s appointment about breast pain? You can, of course, check in with your doctor whenever something’s worrying you, even if you’re pretty sure it’s NBD. But if you have severe breast pain that doesn’t go away and doesn’t seem to be tied to your period, it’s time to get input from a medical professional.

When should I see a doctor about breast pain?

Preparing for your appointment – If you have breast pain that is new, that persistently affects just a particular part of your breast or that affects your quality of life, see your doctor for an evaluation. In some cases, when you call to set up an appointment, you may be referred immediately to a breast health specialist.

Do I need a biopsy for breast pain?

Treatment – For many people, breast pain resolves on its own over time. You may not need any treatment. If you do need help managing your pain or if you need treatment, your doctor might recommend that you:

  • Eliminate an underlying cause or aggravating factor. This may involve a simple adjustment, such as wearing a bra with extra support.
  • Use a topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) medication. You may need to use NSAIDs when your pain is intense. Your doctor may recommend that you apply an NSAID cream directly to the area where you feel pain.
  • Adjust birth control pills. If you take birth control pills, skipping the pill-free week or switching birth control methods may help breast pain symptoms. But don’t try this without your doctor’s advice.
  • Reduce the dose of menopausal hormone therapy. You might consider lowering the dose of menopausal hormone therapy or stopping it entirely.
  • Take a prescription medication. Danazol is the only prescription medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treating fibrocystic breasts. However, danazol carries the risk of potentially severe side effects, such as heart and liver problems, as well as weight gain and voice changes. Tamoxifen, a prescription medication for breast cancer treatment and prevention, may help, but this drug also carries the potential for side effects that may be more bothersome than the breast pain itself.
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What does a doctor look for in a breast exam?

Diagnosis – Tests to evaluate your condition may include:

  • Clinical breast exam. Your doctor checks for changes in your breasts, examining your breasts and the lymph nodes in your lower neck and underarm. Your doctor will likely listen to your heart and lungs and check your chest and abdomen to determine whether the pain could be related to another condition. If your medical history and the breast and physical exam reveal nothing unusual, you may not need additional tests.
  • Mammogram. If your doctor feels a breast lump or unusual thickening, or detects a focused area of pain in your breast tissue, you’ll need an X-ray exam of your breast that evaluates the area of concern found during the breast exam (diagnostic mammogram).
  • Ultrasound. An ultrasound exam uses sound waves to produce images of your breasts, and it’s often done along with a mammogram. You might need an ultrasound to evaluate a focused area of pain even if the mammogram appears normal.
  • Breast biopsy. Suspicious breast lumps, areas of thickening or unusual areas seen during imaging exams may require a biopsy before your doctor can make a diagnosis. During a biopsy, your doctor obtains a small sample of breast tissue from the area in question and sends it for lab analysis.

What kind of doctor should I See for a lump?

Breast discomfort is quite prevalent in women, with over 70% of women suffering breast pain at some point in their life. Breast discomfort might feel like cramps, dull ache, aching, acute sensations, or even a bruise. Its effect varies, making fundamental behaviors such as dressing, walking, and simple acts of intimacy extremely painful in certain circumstances.

If you are causing severe breast pain frequently, you must consult a breast pain doctor immediately. Many women feel breast discomfort as a regular part of their menstrual cycle (periods). This is known as cyclical breast discomfort. Non-cyclical breast discomfort refers to persistent pain in the breast that is not caused by menstruation.

Pain that seems like it’s coming from the breast might sometimes be caused by something else, such as a torn muscle in the chest. This is referred to as chest wall discomfort. A comprehensive assessment consists of a clinical breast exam and imaging investigations such as mammography and ultrasound.

If a mammogram or ultrasound reveals nothing, an MRI may be required. In the absence of evidence on a clinical exam or diagnostic imaging, breast discomfort is frequently linked with benign causes. Tests Performed for breast pain – A breast pain doctor may perform a series of tests to detect any abnormality in your breast.

Also, he /she may discuss your health history and more symptoms you are experiencing. below are the diagnosis test a doctor may perform –

Breast exam – Your doctor will examine both of your breasts as well as the lymph nodes in your armpit, feeling for any lumps or other irregularities that can indicate breast cancer. Mammogram – This is a type of X-ray of the breast. Breast cancer screening using mammograms is a frequent practice. If an abnormality is discovered on screening mammography, your doctor may advise you to get a diagnostic mammogram to further investigate the anomaly. Breast Ultrasound – Ultrasound imaging creates pictures of structures deep within the body by using sound waves. A new breast lump can be ultrasounded to establish whether it is a solid mass or a fluid-filled cyst. Biopsy – The only sure way to diagnose breast cancer is through a biopsy. During a biopsy, your doctor will take a tissue core from the questionable location using a specialized needle instrument guided by X-ray or another imaging test. A tiny metal marker is often left at the spot within your breast to help future imaging examinations identify the region. Biopsy samples are submitted to a lab for testing to see if the cells are malignant. A biopsy sample is also tested for hormone receptors and other receptors that may impact treatment options. MRI – An MRI machine creates images of the inside of your breast using a magnet and radio waves. You will be given a dye injection before your breast MRI. An MRI, unlike other types of imaging procedures, does not employ radiation to produce pictures.

The doctor should consult for breast pain – A gynecologist or family practice doctor will often find a breast anomaly during a regular check-up or mammography before a woman detects it on her own. When women observe changes in the way their breasts feel or appear, they may be unsure of the illnesses that different medical specialists can identify.

Internal/Family Medicine Doctor – An internal medicine doctor, often known as a family practice doctor, treats patients for a variety of ailments ranging from the common cold to back pain. They seldom perform gynecological examinations. Instead, for pelvic examinations or other female-specific health problems, they send patients to a gynecologist.

On the other hand, some family medicine practitioners will perform a breast exam as part of their entire annual health check. If an internal medicine doctor finds a lump or receives abnormal mammography findings, he or she will send the patient to a breast care expert.

  1. Gynecologist – A gynecologist is a doctor who focuses on women’s health.
  2. Many women, particularly those who are young and in good health, only see a gynecologist.
  3. Young women are often seen by their doctor only once a year for an annual gynecological check-up.
  4. They will undergo a pap smear, a breast exam, and mammography at that time if they are old enough.

If regular mammography reveals an abnormality, the gynecologist will alert the patient and recommend her to a breast care expert. Medical Oncologist – If a patient is diagnosed with cancer, she may be sent to a medical oncologist by a breast care expert.

The oncologist will assess whether chemotherapy is a good option for the patient. The medical oncologist will also decide if the patient may benefit from endocrine treatment to treat malignancies caused by hormones. Radiation Oncologist – Radiation oncologists are radiation oncologists that specialize in radiation treatment.

A breast care expert may recommend patients to a radiation specialist if they believe it would be beneficial as part of a comprehensive treatment plan. Breast Care Specialist – When anything changes in a patient’s breast, all roads often lead to a breast care specialist.

  1. When an internist or gynecologist notices something unusual in a patient’s breast, they send the patient to a breast specialist for a diagnosis.
  2. In the majority of situations, the patient has previously undergone mammography.
  3. The breast care expert will perform further tests to evaluate if the patient’s lump or other symptoms indicate benign breast illness or breast cancer.

A breast care expert would often do an ultrasound and, if necessary, ultrasound-guided biopsy to identify the abnormalities. Patients may also opt to get genetic testing to learn about their cancer risk. If the doctor thinks that removing breast tissue is necessary, he or she will proceed with the procedure.

  • If the tissue is malignant, the breast specialist will decide whether the patient might benefit from a referral to a medical oncologist and a radiation oncologist.
  • How to get help for breast pain – Credihealth helps you find the top breast pain doctor in a single click, where you can view their consultation fees, OPD & IPD hours, expertise, services provided, ratings & reviews, and so on.

For a second opinion or teleconsultations, you can arrange an online appointment or send a callback request to Credihealth at 8010-994-994. Aside from that, you may use Credihealth to identify the top clinics and hospitals in your region, schedule a lab test appointment, buy online medicine, apply for a medical loan, and request a home attendant.